Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Informatii si discutii despre proceduri de fertilizare in vitro si inseminare artificiala, despre medici si tratamente, in Romania & abroad.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Joi Mai 12, 2016 1:24 am

Baby selected with pioneering IVF screening born in UK

The first baby born in the UK using a pioneering fertility screening treatment that could help IVF treatment be more effective is now a healthy four-month-old boy.



The first baby born in the UK using a pioneering fertility screening treatment that could help IVF treatment be more effective is now a healthy four-month-old boy.

Biagio Russo was born to Ewa Wybacz, 36, and Sergio Russo, 42, after a course of IVF which used "next-generation sequencing".

The process allows doctors to easily and cheaply choose the embryos which have the strongest chance of growing into healthy babies and has "huge potential" for improving fertility treatments, Professor Dagan Wells told The Times.

New mother Ms Wybacz was told she would not be able to have children after a childhood bout of appendicitis.

She was helped by the new treatment which can boost the chance of pregnancy for women in their mid-30s to almost 80%.

About half of the embryos produced in IVF have the wrong number of chromosomes, which, even if they do result in a pregnancy, can lead to complications,

Until the introduction of this sequencing which rapidly counts chromosomes, the only way of checking was for doctors to manually count and identify problems.

But the process is expensive and as a result is only taken up by one in 20 women.

The new way of counting could now be introduced on the NHS.

Prof Wells introduced the process to Britain after the first "next generation" baby was born in America three years ago.

"New genetic tests have huge potential for improving fertility treatments," he said.

"Our aim is to bring these tests within reach of all patients undergoing IVF, not only the wealthy."



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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Mai 17, 2016 7:03 am

Egg donation: The mother of all gifts

IT was Easter, and Jayne Matthews was talking with her mother Marilyn about her own fading hopes of becoming a mother.

Like many of us, Matthews had believed she would have a baby when the time was right.

Fate had other ideas.

As is often the case for women whose fertility journey turns out nothing like they had imagined, just about everything that could go wrong for the maternal dreams of this bubbly Adelaide-born Melburnian did.

First came breast cancer, diagnosed at 34, in 2007. Two years later came a second bout of the same cancer — not a secondary, thankfully, but a return near the original site — the arduous treatment and a double mastectomy, which succeeded in knocking off the cancerous cells.

But then her relationship ended. The couple, who Matthews felt had arrived at the point where “this time we were going to get married or start to think about having children”, had started the formal IVF process when the relationship collapsed.

Instead, as Matthews was hitting 40, an age at which fertility in most women is seriously compromised, chemotherapy or not, she was single and had gone through chemo-induced menopause.

“I guess for me, I don’t want to dwell on that,” she says. “But that’s why I wasted seven (fertile) years, thinking he was going to be the one I would use my own eggs with no matter how complex it was going to be.”

Still optimistic and hoping her fertility specialist, Associate Professor Kate Stern of Melbourne IVF, could help her body make fresh eggs to give her an even better chance of getting pregnant than the 10 she had frozen before chemo, Matthews started considering donor sperm options.

Again, fate failed to smile, and attempts to stimulate fresh eggs with hormones failed.

On the upside, in 2014, loved friend and former flatmate Marc Grantham provided donor sperm and once her eggs were thawed, two viable embryos were created. To Matthews’ joy, one of them took.

Sadly, at about seven weeks, Stern warned Matthews the foetus had “a very faint heartbeat”.

“I miscarried on the way home in the car,” she says.

As if she had not gone through enough, Matthews lost the pregnancy not long before another crisis many of us dread; the loss of her father, Alan, who died in her arms of a massive heart attack during a road trip in the Northern Territory.

Matthews, now 43, says plainly, “That time was pretty terrible.”

Yet if you the met the Telstra program manager, you would most likely have no clue of this tragic and challenging series of events. Her megawatt smile and buzzy personality make you feel energised and happy in her presence.

Perhaps this is because the woman offering you a homemade pecan and walnut muffin finally got what many may consider her own little miracle and ray of light.

As we chat about events leading up to his arrival, golden-haired Grayson, Matthews’ 10-month-old “super-chilled” baby boy, is burbling in his cot, resisting his afternoon sleep.

He is snug in his cheery nursery, hearing his mother’s voice as she relates one of the happier endings you could hear. And it all came down to a text his mum received out of the blue that fateful Easter as she chatted to her own mother.

Her joy at the turn her story took with those few lines has been so great “it’s hard to put into words”; it was a “monumentally lifesaving gesture”.

Former top swimmer Melissa Russell thinks of her cousin Matthews as “ultimately like my big sister”. She lived with her after her swimming days ended and they grew so close it made perfect sense to offer Matthews a gift that would produce a new life and fill another with happiness.

“Not long after I left (Melbourne to return to her hometown of Adelaide), Jayne got breast cancer for the first time. It was quite difficult not being there through that with her,” says Russell, 31.

“I knew after remission that she was starting with IVF, around the time I got married in 2012, and she wasn’t having a lot of luck.”

It occurred to Russell she had the power to help.

“I remember saying to my husband, ‘After we try to have a baby, I’d be open to donating eggs to Jayne’ — she’d never asked, it was something for down the track.

“Then after I had my daughter Indy (now 3), I kept getting updates and when Jayne let people know her eggs weren’t working I remember reading her email while I was with my husband and I said, ‘What would you think about us giving her my eggs?’ ”

While some couples need to give months of consideration to such an extraordinary gesture, the straightforward reply from Russell’s husband was, “As long as it doesn’t affect us time-wise, because you’re pretty busy at work.”

The couple discussed it further that Easter weekend before Russell sent the text that changed Matthews’ life.

“I can’t remember the exact words but it was something like, ‘It being Easter, I’d like to offer you some of my eggs for IVF,’ ” Russell says. “She (Matthews) didn’t reply straight away, she called me about an hour later and said, ‘I haven’t stopped crying (since I got the text), but there’s so much involved I don’t want you to feel locked in, talk about it more over the weekend and we can talk then.’ ”

Egg donation is a process carefully managed by IVF clinics but is increasingly common, with 6.5 per cent of all fresh egg-stimulation and collection cycles in Victoria done for egg donation.

For donors, the process involves at least two counselling sessions to talk about the implications of donating eggs. They must provide informed consent during these sessions and are required to attend a medical appointment with a Melbourne IVF fertility specialist to discuss their suitability as a donor before they can start treatment to stimulate eggs.

Melbourne IVF head counsellor Marianne Tome says the main thing counsellors want to go through with donors and recipients is the question of how to manage the relationship between the future baby, the donor and recipient, because they have a relationship for life “which is in the best interests of the child”.

“With donors, we want to get an understanding of what their reason for donating is. Often these
are people who know each other — sisters, friends, cousins — usually they will have had children of their own,” Tome says.

“Then we need to look at and talk about their own experiences of parenting and what it might be
like to have a child genetically theirs but not socially theirs — the ability to let go and let the recipient parent as they want. They (donors) need to accept ‘this is a gift I’m giving and it doesn’t give me rights to parenting responsibilities’.”

Counselling sessions with recipients and donors outline what sort of things the donor would and would not have a say in when it comes to the child.

“We always bring the child ‘into the room’ when we’re getting (donors and recipients) to discuss their future relationship expectations and the relationships with half-siblings,” Tome says. “Sometimes, for example, something men find difficult is their wife and children will be connected to another child in another family and they’re not part of that.”

Tome’s counselling staff see donors twice and recipients twice individually and then see them together. She says most donors continue with the process, even after talking through potentially tricky issues.

Counsellors are careful to ensure no party has been in any way coerced into giving eggs or sperm. She says the success of pre-donation counselling can, in part, be seen in the fact many recipients come back to use embryos created by the same donor, with their blessing.

Russell says nothing about the process proved a challenge for her, apart from some temporary bloating, and she felt extremely happy to be giving Matthews something she wanted so dearly.

“I was asked things like, ‘What if she has a boy, and it turns out you can never have a boy, how would you feel about that? Do you think you might wish you had that child, not the person carrying him? All those sorts of things,” Russell says.

“I never saw any issues and I knew I was never going to have any issues. I thought ultimately I would be happy as long as Jayne got the chance to be a parent. That’s the only reason I did it.”

Matthews says because of Russell’s age and their closeness, she always thought Russell was “the
obvious choice” of egg donor, but “I would never have asked her” because it was potentially too much to ask of someone.

Russell adds: “I thought if there’s one person in my life I’d do this for, it’s Jayne. I don’t know anyone else strong enough to do (what Jayne did) … I don’t think anyone I know was concerned about it at all; I don’t know anyone more generous and more giving than Jayne. After everything she’s been through with her cancer, she still volunteers in soup kitchens and just gives her time to everyone.

“This is the biggest thing Jayne wanted to do in her life, over everything else, and being able to be a part of that was fantastic. For something that has had such a big impact on someone, I’m more than happy to have gone through a little bit of discomfort to help her.”

Grantham, who provided donor sperm, was also carefully prepared for the process.

Russell’s parents enjoy seeing plenty of Grayson when Matthews takes him to Adelaide, as do Grantham’s parents, who are also based there.

Russell says she has been slightly surprised that when she says she was an egg donor people often ask, “Do you feel weird about it?” But, she notes, many women say they’ve also considered donating eggs but don’t know how to go about it.

As Grayson finally falls asleep, his mother struggles to put into words her joy at his arrival. He was born via caesarean birth (attended by his nana Marilyn).

Matthews’ luck being Matthews’ luck, she endured three miscarriage scares in the first half of her pregnancy, which she was certain each time meant she had lost her baby. This time, though, it was blessedly not the case.

The straight-talking mum is momentarily lost for words when asked how she felt when Grayson was placed on her chest for the first time after his birth.

“Being pregnant weeks after such a traumatic thing as watching my dad (my hero) die saved my life. I’m not sure how I would have dealt with the grief if there wasn’t a distraction like focusing on the baby’s growth milestones and being able to talk about something positive at a time when I was so heartbroken,” she says.

“The moment when he was born was bittersweet in some ways as my dad wasn’t there to share the most incredible thing that has ever happened to me, but for those first few hours I felt a joy I had never experienced before.

“While Melissa’s gift was selfless and beyond measure, she didn’t realise it was going to be such
a monumentally lifesaving gesture.

“I think in the photo I’ve got with us (after the birth), it’s the only time — and it lasted for a while — that you don’t even have to fake smile for a photo. I’m terrible in photos and I just remember looking at that photo and seeing pure joy and happiness.”

She describes her son as “a champion”, really easy and happy, and very popular with his large crew of grandparents and his biological father.

Matthews feels satisfied all parties are happy with their situation. Though some recipients of eggs or sperm worry about the stability of future relationships with donors, she says “neither of them has given me any reason to think it would be any different from pure love”.

“I’m going to do as much as I can to keep up all his relationships (with his extended families),” she says. “And when Grayson is old enough he can continue those as he likes.

“I am very conscious of everyone feeling they’re included, and that their feelings are all acknowledged.”

Matthews’ body has, incredibly, returned to its pre-menopausal cycle since her pregnancy and she would love to have another child.

As for the baby who resulted from that gift of precious eggs, a beaming Matthews says as she scoops him up after his sleep, “He certainly gets a lot of love, that’s for sure.”



Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Ian 03, 2017 12:16 pm

Two interesting tools, developed by the University of Aberdeen in the UK:

A calculator may help you figure out your chances of having a baby before you begin your first IVF treatment: https://w3.abdn.ac.uk/clsm/opis/tool/ivf1

A second calculator you can use after your first IVF treatment to get a prediction that takes into account the number of embryos transferred and when: https://w3.abdn.ac.uk/clsm/opis/tool/ivf2
I always wondered
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I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Lun Ian 16, 2017 11:33 am

Eggs from Skin Cells? Here’s Why the Next Fertility Technology Will Open Pandora’s Box

Experts warn that a potential IVF breakthrough could have unintended social consequences.

Articolul integral, aici.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Joi Iul 13, 2017 6:18 am

Go 'low carb' to increase fertility chances by five times, experts say

Women should go “low carb” if they want to conceive - because doing so could increase the chance of success by five times, say fertility experts.

They say one portion a day is the limit for those trying to conceive, and advised cutting out all white bread, pasta and breakfast cereals.

Leading doctors said they are advising patients with fertility problems to radically change their diet, after evidence showed that high amounts of refined carbohydrates can seriously damage conception chances.

British clinics yesterday revealed that they have begun enrolling patients on nutrition courses and even cookery classes, amid concern that increasingly stodgy diets are fuelling fertility problems.

Dr Gillian Lockwood, executive director of fertility group IVI, said she advises all patients to cut their carbohydrate intake, amid a growing body of evidence linking such foods to impaired fertility.

High levels of carbohydrates - especially refined ones - are already known to affect the body’s metabolic functions, and can fuel obesity, which in itself reduces fertility.

But experts said there is growing evidence that a typical western diet, with high reliance on convenience foods, high in carbohydrates, badly affects a woman’s reproductive system, reducing the quality of her eggs.

Fertility experts advised all couples trying to conceive to look closely at their diets - and said there was strong evidence that women in particular should cut back on carbohydates.

Dr Lockwood highlighted research which found women with lower carbohydrate intake had four times the success rates of those on standard diets.

The US trial on 120 women undergoing IVF split them in to two groups, depending on the balance of protein and carboyhydrate in their diet. In total, 58 per cent of those in the “low carb” group (meaning at least one quarter of their diet was protein) went on to have a baby.

In the “high carb” group, where less than a quarter of daily energy came from protein, just 11 percent achieved success, the study by the Delaware Institute for Reproductive Medicine (DIRM) in Newark found.

Researchers concluded that those trying for a family should aim for up to 35 per cent protein and less than 40 per cent carbohydrates.



Dr Lockwood, from IVI Midland, in Tamworth, said she now advised all patients to go “low carb”.

“They should be eating plenty of fresh vegetables and protein and limiting their carbohydrate intake to just one group and portion a day.

“I tell my patients that if they are going to have toast for breakfast, then that is their carbs for the day. They cannot then have a sandwich for lunch and pasta for dinner.

“If they want a pasta supper that has to be their carb, or if they want a jacket potato for lunch, then that is it.”

Women were also advised to eat dairy foods as cholesterol is the ‘building block’ for all the reproductive hormones, she said.

Today’s typical diet was storing up fertility problems, she said.

“Modern food is very carb-rich, tasty and cheap, so it’s easy to see why people tend to eat a lot of this food. But it is also very low in nutrition,” she added.



“The women’s partners also need to do their part and scrap their stuffed-crust pizza and enjoy a chicken salad too,” she said.

Speaking at the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology conference in Geneva, British fertility experts said they have just begun diet clasess for infertile couples, in a bid to improve their chances.

Leeds Fertility last month began giving infertile couples four lessons in nutrition - including cookery classes, to encourage them to cut the carbohydrates, and introduce a more varied diet.

Grace Dugdale, the reproductive biologist leading the scheme, said couples trying for a baby should cut out all white bread and pasta, and switch to wholemeal versions.



She suggested replacing processed breakfast cereals with eggs, or natural yoghurt and fruit, and advises swapping lunchtime sandwiches with carb-free salads. When carbohydrates were consumed, unprocessed was best, she said, recommending muesli and porridge over sweetened cereals.

Couples should try to stick to just one portion of carbohydrates a day she said - and make it a complex one, such as brown rice or wholewheat pasta.

Miss Dugdale said: “People should be cautious of the refined carbohydrates in white bread, pasta, cereals, biscuits and cakes because their simpler molecules break down more quickly in the body, causing a spike in blood sugar.

“Over time the body becomes less able to process sugar, leading to poor metabolic health, which can cause inflammation in the body and damage mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cells.

“A woman's eggs are very large cells with a high number of mitochondria, so their quality is affected. Poor diet that includes refined carbohydrates can also affect male fertility by damaging the DNA in sperm. This affects sperm motility, their ability to swim, their morphology, or the shape which makes them good swimmers, and the sperm count, or how much sperm is produced.

“A diet low in refined carbohydrate is therefore important for both the man and the woman.”

The scheme led by Balance Fertility, a research company looking at lifestyle and underling factors behind infertility, will be expanded in September, with patients getting individual consultations to look at their diet and lifestyle in detail.

Prof Adam Balen, chairman of the British Fertility Society, said all couples could give their fertility the best chance by eating a healthy diet, and looking in particular to cut carbohydrate levels.

He said: "We know that diet has a major impact on chance of conception and on egg quality and increasingly it seems that carbohydrates play a particular role."

And he said those struggling with fertility problems should undergo individual consultations to check levels of key nutrients, vitamins and minerals.

The British Dietetic Association said further research into the area was needed. A spokesman said: “As dietitians we don’t promote demonising nutrients, but paying attention to diet, encouraging moderation and portion control both pre and during pregnancy are extremely important for mum, dad and baby.”

Sursa: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07 ... perts-say/
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Sep 19, 2017 8:12 am

IVF couples advised to avoid products with flame retardants as study finds link with infertility

Couples undergoing IVF have been advised to choose products without flame retardants after a study suggested chemicals included in products to stop fire may prevent pregnancy.

Researchers at Harvard University looked at urine samples from 211 women who were undergoing fertility treatments Massachusetts General Hospital in the US.

They found that eight in 10 women had traces of flame retardant chemicals in their samples, but those with the highest levels were around 40 per cent less likely to become pregnant or have a live birth.

"Couples undergoing IVF and trying to improve their chances of success by reducing their exposure to environmental chemicals may want to opt for products that are flame-retardant free," said senior author Dr Russ Hauser, Professor of reproductive physiology, of the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health.

Women with the highest levels of flame retardant chemicals in their urine struggled to get pregnant

The study is the first to examine the link between fertility and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) -- which are used in polyurethane foam in many products, including upholstered furniture, computer casings and gym mats.

PFRs were introduced as a safer alternative to brominated flame retardants which were phased out in the 1990s over fears they were toxic to health and the environment.

However the new study suggests they could he having a damaging impact on fertility. Animal studies had already suggested that PFRs could disrupt hormones in animals, and also migrate out of furniture into household dust and air.

"These findings suggest that exposure to PFRs may be one of many risk factors for lower reproductive success," said first author Courtney Carignan, a research fellow in the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard.

"They also add to the body of evidence indicating a need to reduce the use of these flame retardants and identify safer alternatives."

One in six couples struggles with infertility and previous studies have linked the problem with exposure to products containing hormone-disrupting chemicals, such as pesticides and phthalates, which makes plastic bendy.

The researchers now want to examine whether exposure to flame retardants could also impact fertility for men.

The research was published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Sursa
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[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Oct 27, 2017 4:46 pm

De lipit pe toti peretii! „The number of eggs you have in your ovarian reserve cannot accurately determine your level of fertility. It's the quality of the eggs that really matters—and as of right now, there aren't many tests out there to determine that.” https://www.shape.com/lifestyle/mind-an ... -fertility
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Oct 31, 2017 2:22 pm

New sperm creation method could overcome genetic male infertility – study

Healthy sperm have been created in mice with a common form of infertility, raising hope for future treatment for men with extra sex chromosomes


https://www.theguardian.com/society/201 ... lity-study
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mie Noi 08, 2017 12:48 pm

Transferring just one embryo doubles IVF success

Using just one embryo during IVF results in a much higher chance of a healthy pregnancy and birth, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

The study by scientists at the University of Colorado and Duke University, found that there was twice the likelihood of success if just one embryo was used, after controlling for other factors that influence IVF.

'The most impressive finding that has relevance for all patients undergoing IVF is that performing the transfer with one embryo greatly increases the chance of a healthy baby, the desired objective in IVF,' said Dr Alex Polotsky of CU Advanced Reproductive Medicine, who led the study.

The researchers examined data reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology from 30,000 patients in the USA who underwent IVF using donor eggs between 2012 and 2014.

The most significant finding was that double and triple embryo transfers were much more prevalent among cycles using fresh eggs, which led to a higher incidence of multiple pregnancies. It is well known that multiple births can be associated with complications for the mother and the child – including premature birth and low birth weight.

The study was also the first to compare success rates of IVF using fresh and frozen eggs. Although implantation rates of embryos were slightly better using fresh donor eggs, there was no difference in the chance of a healthy birth using either fresh or frozen eggs.

In traditional IVF using fresh eggs, the donor egg is immediately fertilised and inserted into the uterus of the recipient. For this to result in successful implantation, the hormonal schedule of the egg donor and the recipient need to be aligned.

Using frozen donor eggs offers a cheaper and more convenient way of carrying out fertility treatment. The practice of freezing eggs and cryogenically storing them for use in IVF is becoming increasingly popular.

Irrespective of the source of the donor egg, the most important factor identified as resulting in a healthy pregnancy and birth was to transfer one, instead of multiple, embryos.

'We encourage patients and physicians alike to set their focus on the horizon of achieving a healthy birth outcome. Just achieving a pregnancy is not sufficient,' said Dr Polotsky.

[Sursa.]
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then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Dec 05, 2017 8:52 am

‘It tears every part of your life away’: the truth about male infertility

Men are facing a fertility crisis, so why is most practical and emotional support offered to couples struggling to conceive aimed at women?

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyl ... tility-ivf
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Dec 05, 2017 8:55 am

Fertility treatment: Vitamin D may influence success rate

A new meta-analysis has concluded that there is a relationship between a woman's vitamin D status and the success rate of assisted reproduction therapy.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320076.php
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Dec 05, 2017 8:57 am

Diabetes can cause infertility in men

http://www.newindianexpress.com/lifesty ... 04565.html
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Dec 05, 2017 9:33 am

#FertilityEducation

Do Celebrities Mislead Women About How Easy It Is to Get Pregnant in Your 40s?

Halle Berry had a baby at 47, Laura Linney welcomed her little one at 49, Kelly Preston was 48 when she gave birth, and Geena Davis had twins at 48. Then earlier this year Janet Jackson topped the list after giving birth at age 50. And this is just a handful of the celebrity mamas who are giving birth well past 40 years old.

Should Celebrities Admit When They Use IVF or egg donation?


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I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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