Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Informatii si discutii despre proceduri de fertilizare in vitro si inseminare artificiala, despre medici si tratamente, in Romania & abroad.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Ian 14, 2014 5:57 pm

9 Swedish Women Receive Womb Transplants, Heralding in New Era For Fertility

On Monday morning, a team of Swedish researchers announced a breakthrough for both organ transplantation and fertility. The group of cross-university scientists announced that they have carried out successful womb transplants in nine women. But that’s not all: they are now planning to get that group of women pregnant. Womb transplants have been attempted before, but a pregnancy via donor womb has never before been successful. Welcome to the future.

The team had initially prepared to transfer 10 wombs, but one operation was cancelled. The women who volunteered to donate their wombs felt they had no more use for their own — the operation they underwent was similar to a hysterectomy — and their relatives, who planned to receive them, had either been born without a uterus, or had had them removed.

Amazingly, all the womb transplants were successful, though that’s happened before: Research teams in Saudi Arabia and Turkey had also got this far, and one of the Turkish women with a transplanted womb even become pregnant. But after two months, the pregnancy failed.

So there’s never been a baby born from a transplanted womb, and the Swedish team is thought to be several steps ahead of similar efforts in Britain and Hungary to make it happen first. The Sweden scientists are cautiously optimistic about the upcoming operations, which will see all nine women try to get pregnant via IVF.

And if the pregnancies are successful? Well, for women who have lost a womb, or were born without one — the latter being a condition that affects about one in 4,500 women — the operation could mean a real chance for them to conceive. That said, the transplant-recipients still wouldn’t be able to become pregnant through sex alone: since the transplant operation doesn’t connect the uterus with the fallopian tubes, they’d need IVF.

Still, there are major ethical concerns with the Swedish approach. In Britain, where research teams are trying to raise funding for their own womb transplants, only dead or dying women are permitted to transplant their wombs to living donors. This is because the operation is risky, even more so than a radical hysterectomy, and is considered too dangerous to be lawfully done on living patients — even with their consent.

“[Dr] Mats has done something amazing and we understand completely why he has taken this route, but we are wary of that approach,” Dr. Richard Smith, who runs U.K. charity Womb Transplant UK, told the Associated Press.

Successful transplants of body parts — from the hands and the face, to the liver, lungs and kidneys — have become more commonplace over the last half-century. Last month, it was announced that the world’s first successful five-organ transplant had been performed on an (adorable) three-year-old.



Even though organ transplants themselves are often successful, there’s a dearth of viable organs, in part because the U.S. maintains an “opt-in” donor system rather than “opt-out.” (You can opt-in and become a donor here.) Every day, roughly 20 Americans at the top of the waiting list die without having been successfully matched to an organ.

So, what else is next when it comes to organ donation? Well, researchers around the globe are working on ways to combat the issues with donations: Some scientists are developing artificial organs in the lab; others are building organs from stem cells; machines that keep donor organs alive before transplantation are in development; and new meds are trying to minimize the chance the body will reject its new organs. All of those options are in their primary stages, but the medical community is hopeful that some, if not all, will ultimately be popular and effective enough to save the lives of thousands of Americans each year.

And let it never be said that researchers aren’t thinking outside the box. A neuroscientist recently published a paper suggesting that head transplants — actual transplants of your head, onto another person’s neck, and attached via the spiral cord — could be medically possible. Believe it or not, doctors have been practicing it on animals for decades.

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Ian 31, 2014 9:18 am

IVF And Divorce: Couples Three Times More Likely To Break Up After Failed Fertility Treatment

The question as to whether having children puts a strain on relationships has angered some and made others question their relationships. In 2011, a study conducted by OnePlusOne, a UK charity that helps couples with relationship issues, found that the toughest period in a marriage occurred during transition to parenthood, with couples "failing to see the problems" until it was too late, the Daily Mail reported. A new study, published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, further supports that finding that couples who had marital problems because of failed fertility treatment were more likely to end up in divorce or separation.

Researchers found that, over a span of 12 years, 27 percent of women who did not have children after their fertility treatments were no longer living with their partner. Trille Kjaer and his team used the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish In Vitro Fertilization Registry for their research. They study was comprised of 47,515 Danish women averaging about 32 years old when they were assessed for infertility between 1990 and 2006. Seven years later, the researchers followed up with the hopeful mothers. They found that 57 percent of women had at least one child post-fertility treatment and 43 percent did not have any children. The women who did not have a child were three times more likely to divorce or end things with their partner.

“This research is important because although earlier research have shown that fertility problems and its treatments are major stressors … especially if the treatments are unsuccessful, we did not know how many of these couples who actually decides to split up if they did not get a child,” Kjaer said in an email to Medical Daily.

In fact, previous studies have shown that when attempts to get pregnant failed, even with fertility treatments, there were increased levels of stress and depression in women. Researchers found that, “Unsuccessful IVF affected mental health negatively. One male reflection was that not everyone undergoing IVF was mentally strong enough to deal with failure after failure. Women explained how they had been putting up a shield of optimism prior to treatment and not showing any reactions after failure,” according to another study conducted by Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

Now that we know that there is a higher probability of divorce if you do not get a child after a fertility evaluation,” Kjaer said, “the individual couples and also the medical staff that work with these women can initiate proper interventions earlier and hopefully prevent some of the break ups.”
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Conversely there is also research to point out that some hardships might bring couples closer together. The research refers to this concept as "marital benefit." However, this research does show that not having children is a more negative than positive effect, especially for couples who are actively trying. "Our findings suggest that not having a child after fertility treatment may adversely affect the duration of a relationship for couples with fertility issues," Kjaer said. “Further investigations that account for marital quality and relational well-being of couples with fertility problems are now needed."

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Lun Feb 10, 2014 9:49 pm

Advances lead to IVF baby joy

Most parents feel their children are special but Perth couple Bek and Casey Germein have extra reason with their baby girl believed to be the first born as a result of pioneering new IVF treatment.

Four-month-old Harriet was conceived from a combination of two techniques - one minimised the harmful effects of fertility drugs in women and the other used time-lapse imaging to pick the healthiest embryo to implant.

Claremont-based Fertility Specialists WA used a tweaked form of conventional in-vitro fertilisation known as IVM, or in-vitro maturation, which involves removing immature cells from the ovaries and maturing them in the laboratory before they are fertilised.

Clinic staff also used an Embryoscope, which has been available in a handful of IVF clinics in WA since last year and takes time-lapse images of the developing embryos to help select the most viable, without having to remove them from the incubator.

After years of trying to fall pregnant naturally and using other fertility treatments without success, Mrs Germein conceived and had a healthy pregnancy in the first attempt using the two techniques.

The combined treatment is being studied by embryologist Melanie Walls, the clinic's scientific director John Ryan, and Professor Roger Hart from the University of WA's school of women's and infants' health.

Mrs Germein was one of the first patients enrolled in the study because she has polycystic ovary syndrome, a condition that makes it difficult to tolerate the drugs usually used with IVF to stimulate the ovaries to release mature eggs.

She said she and her husband were thrilled to have been part of the study because it boosted their chances of finally having a baby.

"I had a dream pregnancy and once we had her we forgot about all the dramas," Mrs Germein said. "We now have a beautiful, happy baby girl."

Sursa.
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then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Feb 11, 2014 11:36 am

Simplified IVF 'could improve accessibility'

A simplified IVF procedure could mean fertility treatments becomes cheaper and available to a larger part of the world’s population, according to a new study published in Reproductive BioMedicine Online.

The research demonstrated that success rates for conventional IVF treatment and for the simplified method were similar. Sixteen healthy babies have already been born using the new procedure.

In developing countries involuntary childlessness can create wide ranging societal problems, especially for women.

As many families from poor countries depend entirely on their children for economic survival, childlessness can often be viewed as a social and public-health issue and not only as a medical problem.

Researchers have created a simple, reduced cost IVF method which could be used to replace more expensive incubator systems. This means the procedure could become more affordable to people living in developing countries.

The trend in IVF has been to introduce new and complex instruments and tests, it is hoped that the new embryo culture method may change this philosophy.

Scientists state that other quality studies are needed to determine the reduction in cost and the prospect of different patient groups using this simplified approach.

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Feb 11, 2014 11:40 am

20 Things I Couldn't Say to My Fertility Doctor When I Was Her Patient

Dear Fertility Doctor,

Here are some things I wish you knew, that I couldn't say when we met three years ago:

1. I do not actually want to be here, which is weird, because I just put $15,000 on my credit card to do so.

2. Any calm and charm I exude is a façade. My super-crazy side is reserved for my husband and anonymous infertility friends online. Anything casual you say about my chances of conception will be parsed for hours and days.

3. I respect you, but I also see an acupuncturist, a hypnotist and a psychic.

4. Though my FSH levels are "data" to you, that high number feels to me like it's a low SAT score, like I'm branded and doomed. No matter how much you explain it, I don't understand why you can't be happy if it goes down.

5. I look at the Internet. A LOT.

6. Infertility hurts so far beyond the baby. It's about my marriage, my friendships and my ability to picture a future. It's about my body, and whether everything I've been told about personal power is true.

7. My period feels like a miscarriage every month.

8. I want to feel important to you, even as I know you are successful no matter what happens in my case.

9. It's really weird that we have to do a rectal exam ten minutes after meeting, though I understand the social contract demands we both act cool about it. I never thought that district of my anatomy would be part of getting pregnant.

10. Part of me thinks I can solve this with wheatgrass.

11. I know you want me to grasp statistical reality, but I wouldn't be here if I didn't think I could beat the odds.

12. Probably you were that straight-A pre-med student while I leisurely pursued my English major. I'm intimidated by you, even though I used to pity you for having to toil in organic chemistry when literature seemed much more relevant.

13. I try to act cool about the ultrasound wand, but I'm pretty sure I have PTSD.

14. I don't understand why I have to wait for you without my underwear. I feel everything is skewed that I have to be half-naked while you get a crisp lab coat. OK, I understand, but I hate it.

15. The waiting room is a quiet, tense, darty-eyed purgatory where every minute feels like an hour.

16. It's not the shots that are hard. I would inject myself in the eyeball to get news two weeks earlier.

17. I appreciate when you quote that study saying infertility is as stressful as cancer. I've never had cancer, but I do sometimes feel like I'm dying.

18. Bless you for not telling me to "relax."

19. Despite all these things I just said, I entrust you with my hopes, dreams, ovaries, husband's sperm and maybe even our embryos. Please don't mess with any of these things.

20. Thank you, forever, for helping us along, and finally off, this dark, rocky path.

Sursa.
I always wondered
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something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Feb 11, 2014 11:46 am

Treatment from infertility with ... egg yolk

After spending more than $50,000 on in vitro fertilization (IVF), British couple Mark and Suzanne Harper found success with an unusual treatment – involving egg yolks, Fox News reports.

Testicular cancer left Mark with zero sperm count, and the couple decided to try artificial insemination in order to conceive. That process ultimately failed, so they attempted IVF three different times, but tests revealed Suzanne’s immune system was producing killer cells that attacked the embryos.

After all of these unsuccessful tries, CARE Fertility Nottingham -- where the Harpers had been receiving treatments -- suggested a rare technique. Suzanne would be treated with “intralipid,” a mixture of yolk from a hen’s egg and soy oil. Theoretically, the fatty acids in this combination would prevent the killer cells and lead to a successful pregnancy.

Lucky for the couple, the treatment, in combination with their eighth IVF attempt, worked. Their daughter, Libby, was born in December 2009. Suzanne was one of the first women in Britain to undergo the treatment.

When the couple decided to conceive again, they used the yolk combination. Their fourth IVF attempt was a success, and their daughter, Connie, was born in December 2013.

“It’s all thanks to egg yolk,” Suzanne told the New York Post.

Sursa.
I always wondered
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then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Feb 11, 2014 11:49 am

40 and Pregnant: What It Really Means

Whether you were building your career, searching for the right guy, or just weren’t ready to start a family until now, you’re definitely not alone. The birth rate for women ages 40 to 44 increased by 3 percent from 2008 to 2009, the most recent year for which data is available, which is the highest jump since the late '60s, according to the CDC.

While waiting makes good sense both financially and emotionally, you’ve likely experienced or considered the reality during hours of poring over Google search results: Your eggs simply aren’t as plentiful or healthy as they were 20 years ago. “Most women in their early and mid-40s do fine being pregnant,” says Jeffrey M. Goldberg, M.D., professor and head of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the Cleveland Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. “The problem is getting pregnant—and staying pregnant—with a healthy baby.” That said, baby-making is still a real possibility in this decade. Here’s what the latest science reveals.

1. Here are the real numbers.

Women over 40 have less than a 5-percent chance of getting pregnant naturally during any given reproductive cycle, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. With the use of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), the success rate rises to between 6 and 10 percent, finds the American Pregnancy Association.

Related: The Fashion Girl's Guide to Dressing While Pregnant

2. If you do get pregnant, it may not be with your own eggs.

We can blame Hollywood for this misconception. “Older pregnant celebs often don’t 'fess up to using eggs donated from a younger woman,” says Goldberg. Sure, some 40-something women have success with their own eggs, but it’s not the norm, particularly if you’re getting fertility treatments. A study in the journal Fertility and Sterility found that 40-year-old women treated for infertility have only a 25-percent chance of getting pregnant with their own eggs. By age 43, that number drops to 10 percent, and at 44, it’s only 1.6 percent.

3. A healthy weight can make a big difference.

Yet another reason to stay—or get—in shape: In a recent study of more than 53,000 women, those over 40 who were at a healthy weight when they conceived lowered their risk for Caesarean section, premature birth, low birth-weight, and gestational diabetes, which is particularly common in older pregnant women, says Goldberg.

4. Your odds of miscarriage are higher.

As eggs age, they’re more likely to develop genetic abnormalities that prevent a fetus from growing to full-term, says Mark Surrey, M.D., medical director of the Southern California Reproductive Center. Many miscarriages happen because the baby would not have been born healthy, and, sadly, there’s no amount of prenatal vitamins—or desire for a child—that can prevent the heartbreaking event. And, once again, every passing year makes a difference: Harvard Medical School researchers found among those who underwent IVF a miscarriage rate of 24 percent for 40-year-olds, 38 percent for 43-year-olds, and 54 percent for 44-year-olds.

Related: Would You Get The Selective Reduction Fertility Treatment?

5. The age of the father matters too.

Older men are often patted on the back for their virility—Tony Randall was 77, after all, when he passed out the cigars—but their fertility also declines over time. A study in the journal Nature found higher rates of genetic defects such as autism and schizophrenia in babies fathered by older men, since sperm quality deteriorates with age. So if your hubby’s a silver fox, it’s something to keep in mind when planning a family.

6. Fertility treatments aren’t miracle workers.

“Most women aren’t aware of this, so I always keep a box of tissues on my desk when I tell them,” says Goldberg. Although getting pregnant with no help from artificial insemination or IVF is the least likely of the three methods to result in pregnancy, the success rates by any means decrease to single digits as women get older. If you’re over 40 with regular monthly menstrual cycles, try getting pregnant the natural way for six months—younger women are usually advised to wait a year—before seeking fertility treatments. However, if your period is irregular, see a doctor right away. And if you do end up in an M.D.'s office, expect to undergo standard tests, like checks for fibroids in the uterus and fallopian tubes. You doc may also prescribe drugs such as Clomid or Femara, which help release eggs. Goldberg says three cycles of insemination, which put sperm closer to where they need to be at the time of ovulation, are generally called for before IVF is discussed.

Related: When Should I Have a Baby?

7. There are many ways to get eggs.

If your own aren’t panning out, you still have lots of options, like using a known donor—often a friend or family member—going through an egg-donor agency, or soliciting candidates by putting an ad in a local college newspaper. But there have also been a lot of advancements in egg-freezing technology (by which you choose an egg as opposed to an egg donor) in just the last two years. “Labs around the world have recently refined the technique of egg-freezing to achieve pregnancy rates with frozen and thawed eggs that are comparable to those with fresh eggs,” says Goldberg. He believes that it will soon become common for couples to go to an egg bank, select a donor, have the eggs shipped to their doctor’s office, and use them to make a baby.

8. Genetic testing of embryos improves the odds of IVF success.

With new technology, fertility docs test embryos prior to implantation, allowing them to select the healthiest ones and increase your odds of a successful pregnancy. “We recently published data that found that selective transfer of embryos resulted in pregnancy rates that were not much different between younger women and those up to age 42,” says Surrey, who coauthored the study. This suggests that this new type of fertility treatment might be more successful for older women. “If you use technology to select the healthiest embryos, you have a very good chance of having a successful pregnancy.”

9. Being wrinkle-free won’t do much good.

Alas, you can’t fool Mother Nature—even if you can pass for a decade younger than you actually are. “It's the genetic content of embryos and the mother's age, not her physical health, that determine fertility,” says Surrey. That said, some supplements may boost the eggs you still have left. DHEA, which you can buy over-the-counter at any pharmacy, has been shown to improve the odds of conceiving for those struggling with infertility. “Co Q10 may have a similar potential benefit,” says Surrey.

10. You may want to skip the midwife or home birth.

It may sound more relaxing and natural than checking into the hospital, but the older you are, the higher your risk of complications like diabetes, hypertension, and other potentially dangerous situations that need to be monitored carefully. “Natural deliveries may not always be appropriate for older women,” says Surrey. “I suggest they be screened for these problems, and seriously consider traditional medical care during their pregnancies.” If a home birth is extremely important to you, hammer out a detailed plan B with your doula or midwife in case you run into any complications at go-time.


Sursa.
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then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Feb 11, 2014 11:52 am

Having a baby after fertility problems 'strengthens relationship'

For most couples, going through fertility problems can put a strain on the relationship. But new research suggests that women who have a baby after experiencing fertility issues are more likely to stay in a relationship with their partner.

This is according to a study published in the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 11% of American women and their partners are unable to get pregnant after 1 year of unprotected sex.

The research team, led by Trille Kristina Kjaer of the Unit of Survivorship at the Danish Cancer Society Research Center in Denmark, notes that previous research suggests that when couples experience fertility problems, this can affect them physically and psychologically.

Other studies have shown that if fertility treatment is unsuccessful, this can lead to a lower quality of life for the couple, as well as increased anxiety, depression and stress levels.

However, the investigators say some studies have suggested that couples who go through fertility problems become closer as a result of the experience.

To investigate this further, the researchers analyzed data of 47,515 women from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish IVF (in vitro fertilization) Registry.

The average age of the women was 32 years, and all women had been referred to a Danish hospital for fertility problems between 1990 and 2006.

Women were followed for up to 12 years. On average, follow-up took place for 7 years.

During this time, 57% of the women gave birth to a minimum of one child, while 43% did not give birth.

The researchers found that women who did not give birth to a child were three times more likely to divorce or end the relationship with their partner at the time of the study, compared with women who gave birth to a child.

Commenting on the findings, Dr. Kjaer says:

"Our findings suggest that not having a child after fertility treatment may adversely affect the duration of a relationship for couples with fertility issues."


She adds that further research is needed to determine the relationship quality and well-being of couples who experience fertility problems.

Last year, Medical News Today reported on a study suggesting that a person's personality may affect their fertility.

In more recent fertility news, experts published an analysis in the BMJ, stating that IVF is being overused and the risks of the treatment may outweigh the benefits.

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Feb 14, 2014 12:01 am

3D Video of Swimming Sperm May Aid IVF


A method for taking 3D movies of live sperm could help fertility clinics select the most viable cells for in vitro fertilization (IVF).

Sperm motility is an important predictor of IVF success. The new technique captures the wiggly movement and behavior of sperm in realtime and lets scientists sort the cells to identify defective sperm.

Using the new technique, "we can observe how the sperm move and determine if that movement is affected by any abnormalities in their shape and structure," Giuseppe Di Caprio of the Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems of the National Research Council in Italy and Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., said in a statement. Di Caprio led the team that developed the new technique, detailed today in the journal Biomedical Optics Express. [See 3D Movie of Living Sperm]

The most common way doctors measure sperm concentration and mobility is either by visual inspection or by a process called computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). Although CASA is less subjective than visual inspection, it can only track sperm in 2D.

To develop the new 3D sperm-tracking method, Di Caprio and his team split laser light into two beams, aiming one beam at a dish of live sperm and magnifying it in a microscope. They combined the beam with the second beam, producing an interference pattern. A camera recorded the pattern, creating a hologram.

"Viewing a progressive series of these holograms in a real-time video, we can observe how the sperm move and determine if that movement is affected by any abnormalities in their shape and structure," Di Caprio said.

The new imaging method, known as digital holographic microscopy (DHM), provides a glimpse of the sperm's physiology and movement, allowing researchers to detect abnormalities that could interfere with fertilization, such as a bent tail that hinders the sperm's swimming.

The sperm structure and motility resembled that seen in previous studies, but the new technique goes further, allowing scientists to determine how a sperm's structure affects its motility. For example, most healthy sperm swim in a geometric plane, but the new 3D method showed that sperm with bent tails don't swim in a plane.

The next step is using the tracking technique to choose the best quality sperm for IVF. The researchers want to study sperm cells that have compartments filled with water and other molecules known as vacuoles on their surface, to determine if these cells are less fertile.

In the long run, Di Caprio and others hope to develop a microchip-scale sperm method for sorting sperm by viability.

Sursa.
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I AM SOMEBODY.

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Lun Feb 17, 2014 4:56 pm

„At the fertility clinic, people looked down and didn’t engage with each other. The cancer clinic was marked by sharing and a sense of community.”

http://www.punemirror.in/article/64/201 ... f-IVF.html
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Feb 21, 2014 6:08 pm

IVF children are just as healthy and smart as those conceived normally

CHILDREN conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART) grow to be as healthy and achieve similar educational outcomes to those conceived normally.

A new study comparing adult’s born through reproductive technologies, such as IVF, with non-ART adults found only minor differences between the groups.

ART babies are at increased risk of preterm birth, low birth weight and being small for gestational age. The study’s authors wanted to check whether this led to poorer physical health as they developed.

While the research found the ART group were twice as likely to be admitted to hospital in the first 18 years of life, it was not for serious illness.

“There were increased frequencies of dental extractions, tonsillectomies, hernia repairs and testicular erosion,” said the Murdoch Children’s Institute study.

However, the authors explain the discrepancy as “increased parental vigilance associated with perceived vulnerability in a much-wanted baby”.

The ART adults had an increased risk of asthma and hay fever, were slightly more likely to develop Type 1 diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome and lactose intolerance, says the research published in the journal Fertility and Sterility on Thursday.

However, the study concludes “we found little evidence of significant health disparities”.

A significant increase in attention hyperactivity disorder in ART offspring disappeared when the study accounted for the significance of male gender in the study.

There was no evidence of any difference in autism, speech or learning difficulties or in sexual maturation between the two groups.

Around 80 per cent of both groups completed Year 12 and there was no significant difference in their tertiary entrance scores.

By the time they reached their mid-to-late twenties 48 per cent of ART offspring had completed tertiary education compared to 41 per cent in the non-ART group.

“Most have grown into healthy young adults, with a quality of life and educational achievements similar to their non-ART conceived peers,” the study concludes.

Candice Reed, the first child conceived using ART in Australia, was born in 1980 and many of the children born using this method are now adults.

This study tracked 656 Victorian mothers who used ART and their 547 young adult offspring aged between 18 and 29 years.

It compared their outcomes to reports from 868 mothers and their 549 young adult offspring who were conceived without ART.

Around 3.8 per cent of Australian mothers use ART to help them conceive and every year over 30,000 babies conceived in this way are born.

More than 4.3 million children around the world have been conceived using the technology.

Sursa.
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something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Feb 21, 2014 6:10 pm

New fertility procedure helps PCOS patients get pregnant without hormone injections

For millions of women suffering from polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), trying to conceive can be a heart-breaking experience. But a new procedure is making it easier for patients to get pregnant without hormone injections, meaning a decreased risk for certain complications.

“PCOS is an endocrine disorder where women don’t ovulate on a regular basis,” Dr. Jesse Hade, medical director at Neway Fertility in New York City told FoxNews.com. “It's usually characterized by having multiple little follicles in the ovaries that appear on ultrasound, or having irregular periods, coupled with elevated male hormone levels, or elevated androgen levels.”

Manpreet Sangari, 32, was diagnosed with PCOS after months of trying to get pregnant proved unsuccessful.

“Basically it will be very hard for me to ovulate on my own and have kids … It would be, not a miracle, but it would just, it would take a long time, and that's when [my obstetrician] told me I should go to a fertility doctor,” Sangari told FoxNews.com. “And hearing all that was just crazy because now you're adding more people into the process of baby making, which should have been so simple.”

Sangari went to see Hade, who suggested she try a less-invasive procedure like intrauterine insemination (IUI) before jumping into in vitro fertilization (IVF). But the IUI procedure did not produce a pregnancy, so Sangari tried a round of IVF.

The procedure was a success and Sangari and her husband, 36-year-old Sarbdeep Mokha, were overjoyed to learn she was pregnant with twins. But their excitement was short lived when, not long after, the unthinkable happened.

“I ended up [having a] preterm delivery on the 23rd week and the babies didn't survive,” said Sangari. “The procedure itself was successful, the IVF was successful -- the carrying of the babies was not successful.”

Three months later, when Sangari was ready to try again, Hade suggested a different kind of fertility treatment called in vitro maturation (IVM).

“Usually women with … PCOS are the primary candidates for this procedure because they have lots of little immature follicles which lead to lots of little immature eggs. We then go ahead and harvest all these immature eggs, remove them, and then mature them in the petri dish,” Hade said.

With traditional IVF, patients typically inject themselves with hormone medications for eight to 10 days to stimulate the ovaries into producing multiple eggs for fertilization. This increases the chances of creating healthy embryos for transfer into the uterus.

But hormone injections can be dangerous for PCOS patients because they have an increased risk for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) – a condition that causes the ovaries to become swollen and painful. Sangari developed OHSS during her IVF trial, making her the perfect candidate for IVM.

“In in-vitro maturation, little to none of these [hormone] drugs are given initially, so what we're doing is preparing the endometrium for implantation with hormones to … prime the lining,” Hade said. “And in this process, we wait until the endometrial receptivity gets to its best point, and that's when we trigger the ovulation and remove the immature eggs out.”

The treatment is still considered experimental, so it’s not covered by insurance. But Hade hopes to change that with an ongoing IVM study he is conducting that has shown success rates of 80 percent so far.

Sangari had the procedure, and in October 2013 she and her husband welcomed a daughter, Zoya. They plan on trying for another child.

“We're hoping Dr. Hade helps us get the second baby,” said Sangari. “We had thought of having two kids, and after the first time we got one back, and we need one more.”

Sursa.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Feb 21, 2014 6:12 pm

Are Twins Double the Trouble? Why Fertility Doctors Are Pushing for Single Births

A twin pregnancy may bring with it twice the love, but as recent reports warn, that doesn't necessarily mean the journey is twice as nice. Fertility experts are concerned about an "epidemic" of twins--and they are pushing to lower the rate of twin births.

One look at the numbers and you can see why. While multiple births have dropped in the last five years, those of twins have barely budged. In fact, the rate of twin births is up 76 percent in the past 30 years.

But wait. What's so bad about having twins? Being sandwiched between two adorable little ones during snuggle time, and watching them learn and grow together are two out of many great reasons to want twins. The problems, though, include significant complications such as developmental delays, preeclampsia and premature births.

"We as a society think twins are healthy and always come out great," said Barbara Collura, president of infertility support and advocacy group Resolve. "There's very little reality" about the increased medical risks for babies and moms, she said.

The health concerns related to twin pregnancies are a major reason why the medical community is recommending single embryo transfers during IVF. And while hopeful women and couples may see multiple embryos as a way to boost their odds, new numbers urge against it. With all the new developments and techniques, such as maturing embryos a few days longer or freezing them, the success rates for single embryos seem nearly as good as two or more.

The medical folks are clear in their anxiety about twins. Data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that while only 3 percent of babies born without fertility help are twins and about 12 percent are preterm, nearly half of babies born with advanced fertility help are multiples (mostly twins), with 37 percent born premature. And another new study points the finger at fertility drugs like clomiphene citrate (Clomid) and injectable hormones as a major contributor to multiples. Indeed, multiple births are what the CDC calls "the most common complication" of assisted reproductive technology.

Women should be aware of not only the medical risks but also the cost of having twins, even beyond the price of fertility treatments. There's also the annual care of IVF-conceived, preterm births from multiple gestations, estimated to exceed $1 billion in the U.S.

But for some hopeful couples, two is still better than one--even when money is not an issue. In a study conducted by Dr. Fady Sharara of the Virginia Center for Reproductive Medicine, out of 48 couples who were offered free medication and embryo freezing if they agreed to one transfer at a time instead of two, 18 couples refused.

It's not an uncommon decision. "For older women who have been trying, the last thing you want to do is to do it over and over again," said Shannon P., mother of 3-year-old twins from Pasadena, California, who went through IVF treatments several times before the birth of her twins. "From the patient perspective, you want the best shot. But it really is a case-by-case, patient-by-patient scenario."

And then there are other costs. Sharara tells his patients, "One is hard enough. Two at a time is a killer for some people. Some marriages don't survive this." Shannon agrees, "With all the good things and joy that comes with having twins, there's a lot of sacrifices. It's not just sunshine and roses... It's really hard. It takes a toll on your relationship, on your social life, on your family dynamics."

Still, the sacrifices are worth it.

Eleanor L., a 22-year-old mother of 8-week-old twins, said that when she found out, it was scary to think of having twins while starting her career as a teacher. "But there are those days I'll be heading home from work and smile at the thought of the funny faces or sounds they make… I love having had twins. It's an amazing experience as a mother."

And for Shannon, "The great part about having twins is each partner has a baby to hold, to change, to feed--it becomes a shared experience."

Sursa.
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something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Lun Feb 24, 2014 8:17 pm

New incubator technology claims to increase fertility rate by 10%

"This allows doctors to find out new information about the embryos in a non-invasive way as it avoids the need to take the embryo out of the incubator to assess its development. It improves the selection criteria and, as a result, pregnancy rates."

Articolul integral.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Joi Mar 06, 2014 12:59 pm

Female Fertility: What’s Testosterone Got To Do With It?

New Study Shows Male Hormones Play an Important Role; May Enhance IVF Therapy

Several fertility clinics across the country are beginning to administer testosterone, either through a patch or a gel on the skin, to increase the number of eggs produced by certain women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). Women are also purchasing the over-the-counter supplement DHEA, which is converted by the body into testosterone, to boost their chances of pregnancy with IVF.

A few clinical trials support the use of testosterone given through the skin, while others have shown no benefit of DHEA – also used in attempts to slow aging and enhance muscle mass – in increasing pregnancy and birth rates in women who don’t respond well to IVF therapy. Lacking a large and convincing body of data on the topic, the jury is still out as to whether male hormones such as testosterone improve female fertility.

A new study suggests that male hormones, also called androgens, help drive the development of follicles – structures that contain and ultimately release an egg that can be fertilized by a man’s sperm. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the research also details how male hormones boost the production of follicles in mice. Authors believe the study provides potential biological targets to enhance fertility in women with diminished ovarian reserve, who produce few or no follicles in response to IVF drugs designed to boost follicle development.
Stephen R. Hammes, M.D., Ph.D.

“There is a raging debate in the reproductive endocrinology field about what male hormones are doing in female fertility,” said Stephen R. Hammes, M.D., Ph.D.,senior study author and professor of Endocrinology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. “Our study doesn’t solve the controversy, but, along with some earlier seminal studies from other groups, it does tell us that we can’t dismiss male hormones. They might actually be doing something useful.”

Using multiple animal models and cell experiments, Hammes and lead study author Aritro Sen, Ph.D., research assistant professor of Endocrinology at the medical school found that male hormones promote follicle development in two ways. First, they prevent follicles from dying at an early stage. They do this by ramping up a molecule that stops cells from self destructing, a process called apoptosis. Hammes and Sen speculate that if a woman doesn’t have enough androgens (male hormones), more of her follicles may be dying and fewer progressing to a mature stage when they produce and release an egg.

Second, androgens make ovarian cells more sensitive to follicle-stimulating hormone or FSH, which promotes follicle growth. They do this by creating more FSH receptors – molecules on the surface of ovarian cells that jumpstart the follicle making process in response to the hormone.

“Androgens are increasing follicle growth and ensuring follicles don’t die – exactly what you want when providing fertility treatment,” noted Hammes, who is also the chief of the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at UR Medicine’s Strong Memorial Hospital.

When the team administered small doses of androgens to mice that were taking the equivalent of medications given to women undergoing IVF therapy, they developed more mature, egg-containing follicles than mice that didn’t receive androgens. The androgen-treated female mice also released larger numbers of eggs with ovulation. IVF drugs are designed to do just that, enhance ovulation – the production and discharge of an egg or eggs from the ovary. Unfortunately, these drugs aren’t always effective in women with diminished ovarian reserve.

Kathleen M. Hoeger, M.D., M.P.H., director of UR Medicine’s Strong Fertility Center, estimates that around 20 percent of the patients her team treats have diminished ovarian reserve, meaning they produce fewer follicles than estimated based on their age. Women who are 40 years or older are most likely to have diminished ovarian reserve, but it can appear in younger women as well.

“This information is important because it provides theoretical support for administering androgens to some women undergoing IVF, a practice that our fertility clinic and many others across the country have started in recent years,” said Hoeger, who is also a professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the School of Medicine and Dentistry. “If these data are confirmed in clinical trials, we could propose that raising low levels of androgens in a woman with diminished ovarian reserve might increase her ability to produce more and better eggs for fertilization.”

Hammes says the study calls for further clinical trials to determine whether androgens can have a positive effect on fertility when given at the right doses. And, by better understanding the biological pathways that are important for follicle development, scientists may be able to target these pathways with drugs or other interventions to improve IVF success rates.

In addition to Hammes and Sen, Hen Prizant, Allison Light, Anindita Biswas and Emily Hayes from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry contributed to the research. Ho-Joon Lee, David Barad and Norbert Gleicher from the Center for Human Reproduction in New York also participated in the study. Funding was provided by the Foundation for Reproductive Medicine.

Sursa.
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then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Dum Mar 23, 2014 12:04 pm

My partner had just 16 sperm but IVF doctors gave us our one in a billion baby


Due to Carla Watts' partner Neil's mega low sperm count, conceiving a child seemed impossible - yet they beat incredible odds

Sitting in the fertility clinic, Carla Watts and her partner waited anxiously to hear if their dreams of having a baby would ever come true. Despite all the positive thoughts, their chances seemed slim.

For seven years, she and Neil Wilkinson had endured countless tests, invasive procedures and constant heartbreak – and even moved halfway across the country in their attempt to start a family.

But it was only when Neil provided repeated sperm samples that the couple understood the gravity of their situation. The average man produces tens of millions of sperm at a time. But in the 18 samples they took from Neil the doctors had found just 16. Despite their limited knowledge of biology, Carla and Neil knew that , even with IVF, there was little to no chance of her conceiving. A billion to one chance, in fact.

“We tried to be positive when they told us,” says Carla, 27. “There was no point trying otherwise. But in the back of our minds we thought the IVF probably wouldn’t work. The odds were just too small.”

And Neil, 34, an insurance broker, found the news almost unbearable.

“I felt like I was letting the team down,” he says. “Carla knew how I felt and reassured me it wasn’t my fault but I felt a failure”.

And yet thanks to the miracle of modern medicine, doctors still managed to fertilise some of Carla’s eggs with Neil’s 16 sperm, producing four embryos. Incredibly, Carla became pregnant after the first was implanted and in April last year, the astounded couple welcomed little Ava Rose into the world, truly their one in a billion baby.

“I had to pinch myself to believe she was really here,” says Neil, holding Ava, now 11 months old, at home in ­Portsmouth, Hants. “Even now, I look at her and think she’s so amazing, so beautiful – what a journey to get here.”

The couple, who met while working at Homebase 10 years ago, went to their GP in 2008 after two years of trying to have a baby. They were referred for tests at their local hospital. Carla was devastated to be told she wasn’t producing eggs. Worse, they were told there was nothing the hospital could do.

“They said they couldn’t help us, that we weren’t entitled to any help in our area because I was under 30. We were given the choice of waiting until I was 30, or paying for it ourselves at a cost of up to £10,000.

“Hearing that was awful. As soon as I left the hospital it hit me and I burst into tears.”

Once they got over the shock, the couple considered their options. “I was 23 at the time and we didn’t want to wait seven years,” says Carla. “It made no sense anyway when there’s a better chance the younger you are. Plus, we wanted a family young.”

Resorting to desperate measures due to the so-called “postcode lottery”, they decided to move to an area where they could get free NHS fertility treatment despite Carla’s age.

“It was a big move, and it meant leaving everything behind. We didn’t have jobs, friends or a place to stay but that’s how much we wanted a baby.”

So in August 2010 they moved 150 miles from Portsmouth to Desborough, ­Northants, where Carla’s sister Nicky lived.

“We didn’t go to the GP for a year, as it was important to get settled in the area first,” says Carla. And in August 2011, after they had found jobs, a home and started making friends, they went to their doctor and explained everything.

“We were referred to Kettering General Hospital and had loads of blood tests and examinations. We found out I didn’t have the ovulation problems after all but Neil had a very low sperm count. We just didn’t know quite how low,” says Carla.

In December 2011, the couple were told they were eligible for NHS treatment and in February the following year they went to Care Fertility, a nationwide specialist in IVF, for a consultation.

And they were given the news Neil had azoospermia, a condition that affects 1% of men and causes an absence of sperm.

While a low sperm count might mean hundreds of sperm being present, or even low thousands, with Neil they were looking at the odd individual one.

“That was probably the lowest point for me,” says Neil. “I felt it was me causing all the problems. I’m a laid-back person and try not to let things get me down too much but it was hard. Even though I had done nothing to cause it, I felt guilty but I tried to keep strong for Carla.”

Carla says: “It’s only now that he’s opened up a bit more about it and admitted he felt it had taken his manhood away.”

The couple focused on doing what they could to have a baby. Between March and August, Neil gave more samples in the hope their clinic might find some viable sperm that could be frozen.

Meanwhile, Carla had been on ­medication to stimulate her egg growth and had a procedure to remove them, resulting in 18 eggs. Neil also gave three fresh samples that laboratory manager Lynne Nice inspected through a microscope.

She also defrosted 15 samples taken previously, but could find a total of only 14 sperm. As a last resort, in August 2012, Neil had surgery to open his testicles and inspect tissue for any sperm. Again Lynne went through the samples, this time finding just two viable sperm.

The team had 16 sperm and 18 eggs to work with. “It was a horribly nerve-racking wait to see if any of the embryos had been fertilised,” says Neil. But after two days, there was unbelievable news. Four embryos had been ­fertilised, one of which was implanted into Carla’s womb.

“We were sent home with a ­pregnancy test to do in two weeks’ time. After everything we’d been through it was really difficult waiting,” says Carla. “After seven years, we were about to find out if it had worked.”

After 13 days, Carla could wait no longer and after waking at 2am, she shook Neil awake and did the test. She says: “That two minutes waiting felt like hours. We couldn’t bring ourselves to look at the stick in case it came back negative, I wouldn’t know what to do.

“I peeked at it, but only saw one blue line and turned away. I was ­devastated, I thought it hadn’t worked. But then Neil looked and said, ‘No, there’s two lines’. We just went to sit on the bed, shocked more than anything.”

The emotional impact of their incredible journey hit at their six-week scan. “I cried as our baby – only a couple of centimetres in length – appeared on the screen,” says Carla.

Then at their 20-week scan they found out they were expecting a girl and finally in April last year, Ava was born at Kettering Hospital weighing 7lb 12oz. Soon after, the family moved back to ­Portsmouth.

“She was perfect,” says Carla. “She still is and having her has been absolutely everything and more. The last 11 months have been incredible and I think it feels even more so because of everything we’ve been through. I’m so grateful to Lynne. Anyone else might have missed the sperm or given up. But she persevered and gave us the best gift we could have ever asked for in Ava.”

Sursa.
I always wondered
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something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mie Apr 09, 2014 6:53 am

Genetic testing to predict menopause

A genetic test to predict the start of menopause is likely to be available within five years, allowing women to make more informed decisions about their health and fertility, a leading expert says.

Professor of Reproductive Medicine and Gynaecology at University Medical Centre in the Netherlands, Bart Fauser, said given menopause could begin at very different ages, including before 40 years for about one in 100 women, a test to more precisely predict the timing would be extremely useful, especially for women wanting children.

''The mean age of menopause is 51 but the normal range is between 40 and 60, which is quite considerable … 20 years from minimum to maximum means that for some women, ovarian function lasts 50 per cent longer than for others,'' he said.

''Women often postpone having children until their career is well established, but many find it difficult to become pregnant because of declining fertility after the age of 30. Therefore, it would be very useful for women to know well in advance the age gap in which they can expect to remain fertile. This will allow them to try to conceive naturally or to consider … egg freezing or IVF treatment at a later date.''

Professor Fauser said a meta-analysis of 22 genetic studies involving almost 39,000 European women found 13 gene variants associated with the age of natural menopause that could be used in testing. The research, published in Nature Genetics in 2012, followed the discovery of four other gene variants that seem to be common among women who experience early or late menopause.

Professor Fauser, who presented his research at the Congress of the Asia Pacific Initiative on Reproduction in Brisbane on Friday, said previous studies had also found that mothers and daughters often experienced menopause at a similar age. While research will continue into the genetics of menopause, he believed a genetic test would be available for women of all ages within five years.

At the moment, women wanting to know more about their fertility can have an ''egg timer'' blood test to measure their levels of Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH), a hormone secreted by cells in developing eggs, which are also known as follicles.

Some IVF clinics say the level of AMH in a woman's blood is generally a good indicator of how many fertile years she has left, but some specialists say the test is unreliable.


Sursa.
I always wondered
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something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mie Apr 09, 2014 6:56 am

Possibility of Fertility Drugs Increasing the Risk of Breast Cancer is Bleak!

Research that was carried out earlier, had established a connection between increase of risk in breast cancer and fertility drugs. But, the fresh study conducted by the National Cancer Institute shows that this isn’t necessarily the case.

Fertility Drugs

This research was published not too long ago in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, which is a journal from the American Association for Cancer Research. Amongst women, who are not actually having regular ovulation, intake of fertility medication is usually recommended. These drugs help by generating the production of eggs just in the same proportions as the hormones of a woman would produce in a natural way.

Using this medicine can easily help a woman in getting pregnant and it can also be used along with ART (assisted reproductive technologies), just like IVF (in vitro fertilization) and IUI (intrauterine insemination).

Whether these fertility medications do actually increase the risk of breast cancer, has been a subject of discussion for quite a while. But, quite a few such researches have indicated that there is in fact a strong link between the two of them, and the most recent studies conducted by researchers require deeper investigation.

The Chief of the Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Louise A. Brinton explained – “We wanted to evaluate the long-term relationship of fertility medications and breast cancer risk after controlling for other factors that have been shown to be correlated with both breast cancer risk and use of those drugs.”

The results of the study ‘reassures’ women, and the team discovered that women who had taken doses of this fertility medication called clomiphene citrate (brand name Clomid) or gonadotropins were not at an increased risk of getting afflicted with breast cancer as compared to women who were not taking this medication.

Sursa.
I always wondered
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I AM SOMEBODY.

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mie Apr 09, 2014 6:58 am

Unborn test-tube baby to save thalassemic sibling

Stem cells saved after the birth of the test-tube baby will be used for a bone marrow transplant to cure the elder child since they are a perfect match.

An Emirati mother will soon give birth to a genetically tested baby free of thalassemia so that she can save the life of her elder child with the blood disorder.

Stem cells saved after the birth of the test-tube baby will be used for a bone marrow transplant to cure the elder child since they are a perfect match.

Doctors at the Dubai Gynaecology and Fertility Centre said on Sunday that they completed a pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) screening for a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) match for a couple trying to conceive their second child.

The HLA plays an important part in the body’s immune response to foreign substances.

The procedure was said to be a first for any government centre in Dubai.

“The couple could have tried to conceive normally but chances could be high that the second child would also be born thalassemic,” said Dr Bassel Noah, senior fertility specialist at the centre.

The couple’s four-year-old son requires regular blood transfusions to survive. “They wanted to use IVF technology and genetic screening methods to have a second child whose stem cells could be used to cure their elder child,” said Dr Noah.

To ensure the transplantation process is a success, the couple needed their second child’s HLA to match their first child’s. “At least 15 three-day old embroyos were tested for the implant... Only two to three matched,” said the doctor.

Donor cells need to be HLA-matched so that the recipient’s body would not reject the transplanted cells.

“To ensure the unborn child has the same HLA as the sibling, IVF and genetic diagnosis of the embryo are the latest methods. This technique allows couples to se in vitro fertilisation (IVF) with pre-implantation genetic diagnosis to identify embryos that are an HLA match and only use those embryos to establish pregnancy,” he added. “When a couple has a child with a disease that requires a bone marrow transplant, the optimal source of cells needed for transplant is an HLA-matched sibling.”

The mother was first given fertility drugs so that she could produce enough eggs. Then the IVF procedure was used to make embryos.

“We plucked one cell from a three-day-old embryo to screen for genetic disorders. Screening was also undertaken to see if the embryo would be an HLA match to determine whether it may develop into a suitable stem-cell donor for the sibling with thalassemia. Once we found an HLA match, we implanted the embryo into the mother’s uterus. The pregnancy was confirmed after 14 days,” said Dr Noah.

“This is the first time this procedure has been conducted in a government facility in the UAE,” he added.

“We used all the necessary medical technologies — IVF, screening of embryos for thalassemia and immune system genes, HLA screening etc to ensure the woman conceives a baby whose stem cells can be used to carry out bone marrow transplantation for her elder child.”

This procedure can also be used for couples whose first child suffers from sickle-cell anaemia or certain blood disorders, he said.

Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Mai 17, 2014 10:38 am

Le secret de l'ovule dévoilé


L'élément-clé de l'ovule qui permet au spermatozoïde de le reconnaître et de venir s'ancrer à lui, toute première étape de la fécondation, a été identifié au terme d'une dizaine d'années de recherche, selon des travaux publiés mercredi dans la revue scientifique Nature.


Cette découverte pourrait déboucher sur l'amélioration du traitement de l'infertilité ou le développement de nouveaux contraceptifs, estiment les chercheurs. Pour qu'il y ait fécondation, il faut que l'ovule et le spermatozoïde s'amarrent l'un à l'autre. Cette reconnaissance réciproque et leur capacité à s'attacher l'un à l'autre, premier pas vers leur fusion et la formation de l'embryon, dépendent de la présence de protéines et de leur interaction. Des chercheurs japonais avaient découvert en 2005 la protéine en jeu chez le spermatozoïde, baptisée Izumo, mais son pendant sur l'ovule restait un mystère. Il vient d'être levé. En effet, des chercheurs du Wellcome Trust Sanger (Grande-Bretagne) font état de la découverte de la protéine située sur la membrane de l'ovule, qu'ils ont surnommée Junon (Juno en Anglais), du nom de la déesse de la fertilité. Les souris mâles, dont le sperme n'est pas porteur d'Izumo, sont infertiles. Les souris femelles dénuées de la protéine-récepteur Junon sont également stériles, leurs ovules déficientes étant incapables de fusionner avec du sperme normal pour former un oeuf. Les observations indiquent que l'interaction entre Junon et Izumo est essentielle à la fécondation normale chez les mammifères. Les chercheurs suggèrent en outre que la protéine Junon, qui disparaît rapidement après l'ancrage, joue un rôle dans le blocage qui prévient la fusion avec un spermatozoïde supplémentaire.

Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

Grup FB infertilitate
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Grup FB sarcina & parenting

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