RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Informatii si discutii despre proceduri de fertilizare in vitro si inseminare artificiala, despre medici si tratamente, in Romania & abroad.
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nordic
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Donare sperma in Romania

Mesajde nordic » Joi Oct 08, 2015 9:07 am

Mai exista clinici unde se poate dona sperma (banci de sperma)? Sau toti comanda de la Cryos acum, ca e bine organizat si usor.

Ma intereseaza in Bucuresti, in primul rand.

Am fost pana la Maternitatea Giulesti, dar cand am vazut ca imprejurul receptiei asteapta la 2 m cel putin 10 oameni cu urechile ciulite, mi-a trecut cheful sa mai intreb.

Apoi am mers la Gynera, unde fata de la receptie parea ca a auzit acea intrebare pentru prima oara. Am incercat si prin formularul de contact de pe site-ul lor, dar nu au raspuns deloc, probabil ca folderul ala e plin de spam.

Am caracteristicile fizice care se asteapta, de obicei, de la un donator, inalt, ochi albastri, stare foarte buna de sanatate etc.

Multumesc

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Re: Donare sperma in Romania

Mesajde N.C.B. » Mar Oct 13, 2015 9:44 pm

Nordic, o sa iti raspund ceea ce deja intuiesti: da, in general se merge doar pe Cryos / banci de sperma externe. In Romania nu existau donatori - sau, ma rog, foarte putini, sperma fiecaruia dintre acestia fiind deja utilizata de mai multe ori, era complicat sa ii testeze pentru boli, asteptarea de sase luni si apoi retestarea, stocarea in sine etc.

Este pe forum un interviu din 2012 cu dr. Anca Moisa de la Giulesti, ti-am cautat acum linkul, atunci spunea ca exista banca de sperma, dar se referea la autoconservarea de sperma de la pacienti oncologici. Din ce stiu eu, pentru FIV cu sperma donata intre timp inclusiv la Giulesti se merge pe Cryos.

Inteleg ca ai dori sa donezi si chiar ai facut eforturi (deplasare la cel putin doua clinici) in acest sens. Te intreb cu toata neutralitatea si bunavointa, daca poti sa imi raspunzi aici, anonim: ce te determina sa vrei sa donezi? E rar un astfel de gest (pe care eu il apreciez mult) si m-ar interesa sa inteleg resorturile din spatele acestuia...

Multumesc, numai bine! :)
To make a looooong story short:

FIV nr. 7 (ET nr. 10) reusit, martie-aprilie 2013, Grecia, dr. Konstantinos Giatras.

Din 16 decembrie 2013, mama Larei.

* * *

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Noi 27, 2015 12:06 am

Despre anonimitatea donarii de gameti in UK.

Debating donor conception 10 years after the removal of anonymity



'The kids are not alright.'

'Current legislation needs to do more to protect the rights of donor-conceived children.'

These were some of the comments made by donor-conceived adults who attended '10 Years Since the End of Donor Anonymity: Have We Got It Right?', an event organised by the Progress Educational Trust (PET, the charity that publishes BioNews) in partnership with the National Gamete Donation Trust (NGDT).

The event moderator, Charles Lister – chair of the NGDT – opened with a poignant quote from a 2004 speech by the then Public Health Minister, Melanie Johnson:

'Clinics decide to provide treatment using donors; patients make a decision to receive treatment using donors; donors decide to donate. Donor-conceived children, however, do not decide to be born – is it therefore right that access to information about the donation that led to their birth should be denied to them?'

This quote encapsulated the essence of the debates that led to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (Disclosure of Donor Information) Regulations 2004, which allow donor-conceived people born from donations made after 1 April 2005 access to identifying information about their donor on reaching the age of 18. It also set the scene for a series of lively presentations from a panel of five experts, who took to the stage to offer their perspective on the impact of the legislation.

First to speak was Juliet Tizzard, Director of Strategy at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), who gave the regulator's perspective on the change in law. Tizzard identified the lack of reliable outcome metrics in relation to donor conception as a key challenge, and hindrance, to accurate impact evaluation of the 2004 regulations. She also opined that the assessment of post-regulation sperm and egg donation trend as proxy measure of impact showed a gradual but steady increase in number of new donors registering in the UK – a reality that is a far cry from the doomsday prophecies of the early critics of the law, who predicted the possibility of severe donor shortages arising as a result of the end to donor anonymity.

Next on stage was Dr Jo Rose, a donor-conceived adult who won a landmark court case that contributed to the decision to end donor anonymity in the UK. In her presentation, Rose argued that donor-conceived children should, as a matter of course, have more support and the right to access full and complete information about their genetic parent, particularly because 'wrong and incomplete medical history kills people'. She also argued that a lack of retrospective access to identifying information means a number of donor-conceived people born before April 2005 live the rest of their lives 'tortured' by not knowing who their genetic family is.

'Why then should we have legislation that protects the rights of donors but ignores the rights of donor offspring?' she asked the audience.

Rose's presentation gave a personal note to the debate and made it easy to appreciate the rationale behind her call for retrospective disclosure of donor identity. According to her, more needs to be done to ensure 'equality and respect for genetic kinship and identity for all groups of the society'.

Eric Blyth, Emeritus Professor of Social Work at the University of Huddersfield, also made a case for retrospective disclosure of donor identity. Using data from the HFEA, Professor Blyth argued that the lack of retrospective access to identifying donor information means that upwards of 20,000 donor-conceived people born between 1991–2004 in the UK are denied the right to learn the identify of their donor.

Blyth also argued that, since the data presented by Tizzard showed that more than 150 donors who donated prior to April 2005 have chosen to waive their right to anonymity, protecting donor privacy may not be seen as equally important by all of those donors.

Venessa Smith, the Quality Assurance and Patient Coordinator at the London Women's Clinic, offered insights from the perspective of the service providers. She reported a change in sperm-donor demography and composition from 'young men donating for "beer money" pre-2005, to young professional males with families donating purely for altruistic reasons post-2005'. This, she argued, may be attributable to a post-2005 paradigm shift that resulted in a greater focus on the welfare of the donor-conceived child, rather than merely the successful outcome of the assisted reproduction process.

Smith also argued that the routine support and counselling offered to post-2005 donors ensures that 'donors who do make a donation are the right ones for the patients'. This has contributed to a significant increase in number of donors at the London Sperm Bank and London Egg Bank, she reported, such that patients now have a variety of choice and no longer have to wait long for donors.

The last presenter for the evening was Susan Golombok, Professor of Family Research and Director of the Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge. Her presentation focused on the how disclosure of donor conception in the UK had changed over the past 30 years.

Professor Golombok discussed two longitudinal studies. The first followed 111 donor insemination (DI) families who had children born in the mid-1980s, and another conducted some 15 years later followed 50 DI families and 51 egg donor (ED) families. In summary, in the earlier study fewer than 10 percent of parents had disclosed by the age of 18, whereas in the later study 67 percent of ED parents and 41 percent of DI parents had disclosed by the age of 14. So while it was encouraging to learn that the number of parents disclosing has increased, it was also apparent that parents who initially indicated willingness to disclose donor conception to their children did not always go on to do so.

When considering the welfare of the child, it was reassuring that no child responded to disclosure in a negative way, and no parents regretted disclosing.

The panel also fielded some questions from the audience, which centred on the practical aspects of donor disclosure. Emma Cresswell, a donor-conceived adult in the audience, insisted that it was no longer right to withhold information from donor-conceived adults. She argued that disclosure of donor conception should be an ethical duty, a parental responsibility and a legal requirement. She suggested that inclusion of identifying donor information on a donor-conceived child's birth certificate would guarantee this disclosure.

A number of audience members backed up this call for a review of current legislation to encourage disclosure, as and to remove donor anonymity retrospectively. Others raised questions about the ethics and practicality of enforcing the disclosure of donor conception, and pointed out that retrospectively lifting donor anonymity breaks promises made to people who donated before 2005.

Juliet Tizzard said that, in her view, the best approach was to support parents of donor-conceived children to encourage disclosure, rather than seeking to mandate it. Caroline Spencer, a behavioural psychologist and trustee of the Donor Conception Network, also emphasised the need to educate parents of donor-conceived children on the importance of disclosure while supporting them with practical tools and tips.

By the end of the evening, it was clear that emotions around the debate on donor anonymity run high, that neither the audience nor the panel would reach a consensus, and that issues surrounding donor anonymity and disclosure will continue to be hotly debated.


Sursa: http://www.bionews.org.uk/page_583995.asp
I always wondered
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something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Joi Mai 05, 2016 12:21 pm

WHEN reports surfaced today that 49-year-old singer Janet Jackson, who will turn 50 on May 16, is pregnant with her first child, many fertility experts felt a familiar sense of frustration.

“When Janet Jackson says ‘We decided to focus on our family’ and two months later she’s pregnant, it makes it look like that’s all you need to do at age 49. It’s not helpful for women who are struggling to conceive on their own,” said IVF specialist and fertility expert Dr Devora Lieberman, from Sydney’s Genea clinic.

[...]

“The only thing that works in women over 45 is an egg donor” , Prof. Illingworth said. “The younger the egg donor, the better.”

President of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Dr Steve Robson, says older women struggling to fall pregnant need to be reassured that natural pregnancies over the age of 44 are “almost impossible”.

“Every pregnancy I’ve seen in women over 45 has been through a donated egg,” he said.

[...]

Kelly Preston and Geena Davis both had children at 48. Halle Berry gave birth at 46 and David Bowie’s wife Iman fell pregnant with the couple’s son at age 45.

Articolul integral, aici.
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then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Mai 17, 2016 7:01 am

Egg donation: The mother of all gifts

IT was Easter, and Jayne Matthews was talking with her mother Marilyn about her own fading hopes of becoming a mother.

Like many of us, Matthews had believed she would have a baby when the time was right.

Fate had other ideas.

As is often the case for women whose fertility journey turns out nothing like they had imagined, just about everything that could go wrong for the maternal dreams of this bubbly Adelaide-born Melburnian did.

First came breast cancer, diagnosed at 34, in 2007. Two years later came a second bout of the same cancer — not a secondary, thankfully, but a return near the original site — the arduous treatment and a double mastectomy, which succeeded in knocking off the cancerous cells.

But then her relationship ended. The couple, who Matthews felt had arrived at the point where “this time we were going to get married or start to think about having children”, had started the formal IVF process when the relationship collapsed.

Instead, as Matthews was hitting 40, an age at which fertility in most women is seriously compromised, chemotherapy or not, she was single and had gone through chemo-induced menopause.

“I guess for me, I don’t want to dwell on that,” she says. “But that’s why I wasted seven (fertile) years, thinking he was going to be the one I would use my own eggs with no matter how complex it was going to be.”

Still optimistic and hoping her fertility specialist, Associate Professor Kate Stern of Melbourne IVF, could help her body make fresh eggs to give her an even better chance of getting pregnant than the 10 she had frozen before chemo, Matthews started considering donor sperm options.

Again, fate failed to smile, and attempts to stimulate fresh eggs with hormones failed.

On the upside, in 2014, loved friend and former flatmate Marc Grantham provided donor sperm and once her eggs were thawed, two viable embryos were created. To Matthews’ joy, one of them took.

Sadly, at about seven weeks, Stern warned Matthews the foetus had “a very faint heartbeat”.

“I miscarried on the way home in the car,” she says.

As if she had not gone through enough, Matthews lost the pregnancy not long before another crisis many of us dread; the loss of her father, Alan, who died in her arms of a massive heart attack during a road trip in the Northern Territory.

Matthews, now 43, says plainly, “That time was pretty terrible.”

Yet if you the met the Telstra program manager, you would most likely have no clue of this tragic and challenging series of events. Her megawatt smile and buzzy personality make you feel energised and happy in her presence.

Perhaps this is because the woman offering you a homemade pecan and walnut muffin finally got what many may consider her own little miracle and ray of light.

As we chat about events leading up to his arrival, golden-haired Grayson, Matthews’ 10-month-old “super-chilled” baby boy, is burbling in his cot, resisting his afternoon sleep.

He is snug in his cheery nursery, hearing his mother’s voice as she relates one of the happier endings you could hear. And it all came down to a text his mum received out of the blue that fateful Easter as she chatted to her own mother.

Her joy at the turn her story took with those few lines has been so great “it’s hard to put into words”; it was a “monumentally lifesaving gesture”.

Former top swimmer Melissa Russell thinks of her cousin Matthews as “ultimately like my big sister”. She lived with her after her swimming days ended and they grew so close it made perfect sense to offer Matthews a gift that would produce a new life and fill another with happiness.

“Not long after I left (Melbourne to return to her hometown of Adelaide), Jayne got breast cancer for the first time. It was quite difficult not being there through that with her,” says Russell, 31.

“I knew after remission that she was starting with IVF, around the time I got married in 2012, and she wasn’t having a lot of luck.”

It occurred to Russell she had the power to help.

“I remember saying to my husband, ‘After we try to have a baby, I’d be open to donating eggs to Jayne’ — she’d never asked, it was something for down the track.

“Then after I had my daughter Indy (now 3), I kept getting updates and when Jayne let people know her eggs weren’t working I remember reading her email while I was with my husband and I said, ‘What would you think about us giving her my eggs?’ ”

While some couples need to give months of consideration to such an extraordinary gesture, the straightforward reply from Russell’s husband was, “As long as it doesn’t affect us time-wise, because you’re pretty busy at work.”

The couple discussed it further that Easter weekend before Russell sent the text that changed Matthews’ life.

“I can’t remember the exact words but it was something like, ‘It being Easter, I’d like to offer you some of my eggs for IVF,’ ” Russell says. “She (Matthews) didn’t reply straight away, she called me about an hour later and said, ‘I haven’t stopped crying (since I got the text), but there’s so much involved I don’t want you to feel locked in, talk about it more over the weekend and we can talk then.’ ”

Egg donation is a process carefully managed by IVF clinics but is increasingly common, with 6.5 per cent of all fresh egg-stimulation and collection cycles in Victoria done for egg donation.

For donors, the process involves at least two counselling sessions to talk about the implications of donating eggs. They must provide informed consent during these sessions and are required to attend a medical appointment with a Melbourne IVF fertility specialist to discuss their suitability as a donor before they can start treatment to stimulate eggs.

Melbourne IVF head counsellor Marianne Tome says the main thing counsellors want to go through with donors and recipients is the question of how to manage the relationship between the future baby, the donor and recipient, because they have a relationship for life “which is in the best interests of the child”.

“With donors, we want to get an understanding of what their reason for donating is. Often these
are people who know each other — sisters, friends, cousins — usually they will have had children of their own,” Tome says.

“Then we need to look at and talk about their own experiences of parenting and what it might be
like to have a child genetically theirs but not socially theirs — the ability to let go and let the recipient parent as they want. They (donors) need to accept ‘this is a gift I’m giving and it doesn’t give me rights to parenting responsibilities’.”

Counselling sessions with recipients and donors outline what sort of things the donor would and would not have a say in when it comes to the child.

“We always bring the child ‘into the room’ when we’re getting (donors and recipients) to discuss their future relationship expectations and the relationships with half-siblings,” Tome says. “Sometimes, for example, something men find difficult is their wife and children will be connected to another child in another family and they’re not part of that.”

Tome’s counselling staff see donors twice and recipients twice individually and then see them together. She says most donors continue with the process, even after talking through potentially tricky issues.

Counsellors are careful to ensure no party has been in any way coerced into giving eggs or sperm. She says the success of pre-donation counselling can, in part, be seen in the fact many recipients come back to use embryos created by the same donor, with their blessing.

Russell says nothing about the process proved a challenge for her, apart from some temporary bloating, and she felt extremely happy to be giving Matthews something she wanted so dearly.

“I was asked things like, ‘What if she has a boy, and it turns out you can never have a boy, how would you feel about that? Do you think you might wish you had that child, not the person carrying him? All those sorts of things,” Russell says.

“I never saw any issues and I knew I was never going to have any issues. I thought ultimately I would be happy as long as Jayne got the chance to be a parent. That’s the only reason I did it.”

Matthews says because of Russell’s age and their closeness, she always thought Russell was “the
obvious choice” of egg donor, but “I would never have asked her” because it was potentially too much to ask of someone.

Russell adds: “I thought if there’s one person in my life I’d do this for, it’s Jayne. I don’t know anyone else strong enough to do (what Jayne did) … I don’t think anyone I know was concerned about it at all; I don’t know anyone more generous and more giving than Jayne. After everything she’s been through with her cancer, she still volunteers in soup kitchens and just gives her time to everyone.

“This is the biggest thing Jayne wanted to do in her life, over everything else, and being able to be a part of that was fantastic. For something that has had such a big impact on someone, I’m more than happy to have gone through a little bit of discomfort to help her.”

Grantham, who provided donor sperm, was also carefully prepared for the process.

Russell’s parents enjoy seeing plenty of Grayson when Matthews takes him to Adelaide, as do Grantham’s parents, who are also based there.

Russell says she has been slightly surprised that when she says she was an egg donor people often ask, “Do you feel weird about it?” But, she notes, many women say they’ve also considered donating eggs but don’t know how to go about it.

As Grayson finally falls asleep, his mother struggles to put into words her joy at his arrival. He was born via caesarean birth (attended by his nana Marilyn).

Matthews’ luck being Matthews’ luck, she endured three miscarriage scares in the first half of her pregnancy, which she was certain each time meant she had lost her baby. This time, though, it was blessedly not the case.

The straight-talking mum is momentarily lost for words when asked how she felt when Grayson was placed on her chest for the first time after his birth.

“Being pregnant weeks after such a traumatic thing as watching my dad (my hero) die saved my life. I’m not sure how I would have dealt with the grief if there wasn’t a distraction like focusing on the baby’s growth milestones and being able to talk about something positive at a time when I was so heartbroken,” she says.

“The moment when he was born was bittersweet in some ways as my dad wasn’t there to share the most incredible thing that has ever happened to me, but for those first few hours I felt a joy I had never experienced before.

“While Melissa’s gift was selfless and beyond measure, she didn’t realise it was going to be such
a monumentally lifesaving gesture.

“I think in the photo I’ve got with us (after the birth), it’s the only time — and it lasted for a while — that you don’t even have to fake smile for a photo. I’m terrible in photos and I just remember looking at that photo and seeing pure joy and happiness.”

She describes her son as “a champion”, really easy and happy, and very popular with his large crew of grandparents and his biological father.

Matthews feels satisfied all parties are happy with their situation. Though some recipients of eggs or sperm worry about the stability of future relationships with donors, she says “neither of them has given me any reason to think it would be any different from pure love”.

“I’m going to do as much as I can to keep up all his relationships (with his extended families),” she says. “And when Grayson is old enough he can continue those as he likes.

“I am very conscious of everyone feeling they’re included, and that their feelings are all acknowledged.”

Matthews’ body has, incredibly, returned to its pre-menopausal cycle since her pregnancy and she would love to have another child.

As for the baby who resulted from that gift of precious eggs, a beaming Matthews says as she scoops him up after his sleep, “He certainly gets a lot of love, that’s for sure.”



Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Mesajde N.C.B. » Vin Iun 17, 2016 3:30 pm

Ladies and gentlemen, am nevoie de feedback-ul unei categorii speciale dintre voi. Voi participa ca speaker la congresul ESHRE iar tema sesiunii la care particip este in acest an dubla donare de gameti si embriodonatia. Incep prin a va spune ca in cei opt ani + de activitate asociativa am urmarit mii de cazuri, unele cu totul exceptionale / „spectaculoase”, dar INTOTDEAUNA am pastrat confidentialitatea identitatii persoanelor care mi-au incredintat informatii. Continuu prin a va spune ca eu insami (desi eram un cuplu cu ovocite, spermatozoizi, embrioni viabili si sarcina evolutiva in istoric), exasperata de esecurile fara numar - fara numar, am luat in calcul varianta FIV-ului cu dubla donare de gameti si daca UN SINGUR medic m-ar fi sustinut in acest proiect, as fi mers pe calea asta. Deci, veti gasi la mine confidentialitate si empatie, va asigur. Am nevoie din punct de vedere pur stiintific / de cercetare de informatii din partea persoanelor care au facut apel la FIV cu dubla donare de gameti sau embriodonatie.

Cei care au avut o astfel de experienta si vor sa imi raspunda la cateva intrebari, sunt rugati sa imi scrie la nicole.fertilityeurope@gmail.com (este o adresa individuala, nu cea asociativa, cu acces colectiv) un mail scurt si le voi trimite intrebarile.

Noi nu avem reglementare legala in domeniu, dupa cum stiti, ca atare sunt nevoita sa culeg informatii de la medici (on going) si de la pacienti, ca sa inteleg ce se intampla in Romania in aceasta nișă. Va multumesc mult!
To make a looooong story short:

FIV nr. 7 (ET nr. 10) reusit, martie-aprilie 2013, Grecia, dr. Konstantinos Giatras.

Din 16 decembrie 2013, mama Larei.

* * *

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Oct 04, 2016 1:49 am

Despre dubla donare de gameti si embriodonare, aici: viewtopic.php?f=4&t=691
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Mesajde Netty » Joi Dec 01, 2016 4:19 pm

Buna ziua!
Am ajuns la faza in care sunt nevoita sa recurg la FIV cu ovocite donate. Cum in Romania nu se mai practica procedura in sine m-as orienta catre Cehia. A facut cineva aceasta procedura recent in Cehia? Ce presupune asta, ce preturi ar fi ...cat dureaza? Am rasfoit putin forumul si nu am gasit nimic care sa ma lamureasca. Va multumesc anticipat si va doresc un 1 Decembrie placut! :-*

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Oct 20, 2017 10:10 am

I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Noi 03, 2017 4:56 pm

No increased risk of childhood cancer after donor assisted reproductive technology https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article ... m=fulltext
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: RUAM cu terț donator. / FIV cu ovocite donate in Romania?

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Noi 21, 2017 9:07 am

Informatii interesante, aici: https://eggdonorideas.com/en/increasing ... -transfer/

Humans produce a large percentage of eggs and embryos with abnormal chromosome count (aneuploidy)
Aneuploidy is almost always lethal for embryo (the main reason of implantation failure, or early miscarriage as nature recognizes these chromosome mistakes and stops them).
nfluence of aneuploidy on embryonic ‘looks’ on day 5 is minimal (two sibling embryos one with normal chromosome count and one with abnormal chromosome count may look under the microscope absolutely similar superior morphology blastocysts of AA quality!)
In 35 year old women half of blastocysts are abnormal, in 40 year old women 70% of blastocysts are abnormal. In other words the higher the age the higher the aneuploidy rates.
Even in blastocysts created from egg donor eggs 30% of blastocysts are abnormal!
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Imagine ... Imagine... Imagine ... Imagine ...Imagine ... Imagine... Imagine


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