Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asistata

Informatii si discutii despre proceduri de fertilizare in vitro si inseminare artificiala, despre medici si tratamente, in Romania & abroad.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Mai 17, 2014 10:39 am

Male infertility: It's all about the (DNA) package


Infertility is generally thought of as a woman's problem. In fact, more than 3 million men across America also experience it. Today, researchers from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) describe a key event during sperm development that is essential for male fertility. A team led by CSHL Professor Alea Mills explains how a protein controls DNA packaging to protect a man's genetic information.

The sperm is a simple delivery vehicle for a man's genetic information. The highly specialized cell is little more than a DNA bundle powered by molecular motors. As such, it is necessarily tiny: from head to tail a sperm cell is only about 50 micrometers long (1/500th of an inch), invisible to the naked eye. An egg is 30 times larger. The sperm's small size has its benefits -- less bulk to carry while searching for an egg -- but it also presents significant challenges. A man's genetic material must be very tightly packaged to fit within a minuscule space.

This organizational problem is not unique to sperm. Every cell in our body contains a full human genome, which spans nearly two meters (6 feet) if unfurled. To contain this massive length of DNA, cells tightly compress our genetic information. In every cell nucleus, DNA is wrapped like thread around protein spools, called histones. The thread can be easily unwound at any time to allow access to the genetic information. In sperm, the packaging problem is much more acute, as its DNA is even more condensed. The spool-like histones are replaced with tiny proteins called protamines. This repackaging process, called chromatin remodeling, is absolutely essential for male fertility.

In work published today in Nature Communications, Mills and her team identify a protein, called Chd5, as a key regulator of chromatin remodeling during sperm development. Mills and Wangzhi Li, PhD, lead author on the study, removed both copies of the Chd5 gene from male mice. They discovered that these males had severe fertility defects, ranging from low sperm counts to decreased sperm motility. The defective sperm failed to fertilize eggs when in vitro fertilization (IVF) was performed.

Mills has been interested in Chd5 since the time that her team first discovered it in 2007 as a potent tumor suppressor, one that can stop cells from becoming cancerous. "We know this ability has something to do with chromatin remodeling -- that when defective, causes normal cells to transform into tumors," says Mills. "But the most dramatic chromatin reorganization occurs when specialized cells carrying our genetic blueprint develop into sperm cells. It makes sense that Chd5 would be functioning there, too."

This, indeed, is what Mills and her team found. When Chd5 is missing, chromatin remodeling is disrupted. Histones are not efficiently replaced with protamines to repackage DNA, resulting in a more uneven, less condensed genome.

This change in DNA packaging has dramatic effects on the DNA itself. In the absence of Chd5, the double helix becomes damaged, breaking at multiple points throughout the genome. "So in addition to infertility, loss of Chd5 may put future generations -- the rare embryos that do get fertilized with defective sperm -- at risk for disease," says Mills. "Chd5 may protect a person from medical conditions related to DNA damage and spontaneous mutations, like cancer and autism."

The team is actively studying the role of Chd5 in human fertility. They analyzed Chd5 levels using data from testes biopsies obtained from men with fertility defects. "We found that men with more severe defects had the lowest levels of Chd5," says Mills. "While it is only a correlation at this point, we are eager to understand fully how Chd5 affects sperm development in humans."


Sursa.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Mai 17, 2014 10:54 am

Orlando Doctor Achieves Medical First through IVF with Successful Delivery to 46-Year Old Woman

WINTER PARK, Fla., May 13, 2014 /NEWS.GNOM.ES/ – Fertility C.A.R.E. (Center of Assisted Reproduction & Endocrinology) and the Vivere-Winter Park Fertility Laboratory have announced the first successful delivery of a healthy baby by a 46-year-old woman through in vitro fertilization (IVF) using her biological eggs and specialized reproductive hormone therapies.

The Orlando-area woman had never had a child, but she and her husband very much wanted to be parents when she became a patient of Mark P. Trolice, M.D, founder of Fertility C.A.R.E. and medical director at Vivere-Winter Park Fertility Laboratory.

“Generally speaking, options for women with infertility in their mid-forties and beyond have been limited to IVF treatments involving donor eggs or adoption,” said Trolice, whose groundbreaking work was recently published in Fertility and Sterility, a publication of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). “But many women would prefer to conceive a biologically-related child.”

The percentage of women delaying childbearing has steadily increased in recent decades. A report issued just this month by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) stated there were more than nine times as many first births to mothers 35 and older in 2012 than there were in the 1970s. Since fertility for women begins to decline in their early 30s – a trend that dramatically accelerates when a woman reaches her late 30s and early 40s – the delay can pose significant challenges for women who postpone motherhood. The ASRM reports a less than 5% chance of pregnancy per month in women above age 39 and nearly one-third will miscarry.

As part of the Orlando woman’s quest to become a mother, she underwent IVF by Dr. Trolice using traditional egg-harvesting and embryo implantation, coupled with innovative hormone therapies and careful monitoring. Ultimately, she successfully conceived but her obstacles continued. The pregnancy was complicated by incompetence of her cervix requiring emergency suturing (cerclage) to maintain the baby inside her uterus until maturity. This was followed by hospitalization for 10 weeks. At 31.5 weeks, she underwent cesarean section with delivery of a healthy baby boy, who remains thriving at eight months of age.

“Playing a role in the life of my patient and her son was a real honor,” said Trolice. “Though against the odds, we employed IVF techniques that now may provide some women the chance to become mothers and grow their families.”

Sursa.
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I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Mai 17, 2014 10:55 am

Researcher explores the invisible, ignored epidemic of male infertility

Culturally speaking, infertile men are invisible. That’s the finding of Cambridge University medical sociologist Liberty Walther Barnes, who spent six years tracking patients of five U.S. male fertility clinics and found that more than half of the men she tracked did not consider themselves infertile— despite trying to impregnate their wives for more than a year and having a low or zero sperm count.

The reason, according to Barnes: Everybody tiptoes around a man’s fertility and specialists often push treatments like in vitro fertilization (IVF) on infertile couples, despite it being a female “solution” to what is equally likely to be male “problem.” Also, men just don’t have any of the social support that infertile women have.

A mother of four kids, Barnes, 38, recently spoke with Today Moms about her new book, “Conceiving Masculinity: Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity.”

What sparked the idea for your research?

Barnes: Around twelve years ago, my husband Levi and I started seeing a fertility specialist. I have an irregular menstrual cycle and the first thing the doctor wanted to try was artificial insemination with Levi’s sperm. But the night before we were going in, my husband came down with this awful flu, huddled in a blanket and shivering. Still, we went to the office the next morning, and there was Levi holding this sad little cup and the doctor told us “All of your sperm is dead.”

What struck me was how protective they were of Levi, telling him not to worry, it only takes one sperm. No one actually uttered the word infertile. Meanwhile, I was the one made to feel like my egg had to find this one sperm, that, as the woman, it was all riding on me to make this work.
In her new book, Liberty Walther Barnes writes about the invisibility of male infertility.
Liberty Walther Barnes
In her new book, Liberty Walther Barnes writes about the invisibility of male infertility.

By the time I got into the field, I started interviewing men at fertility clinics and quickly discovered, lo and behold, these men do not think they’re infertile — even if they have a zero sperm count.

After a while, I would just ask them up front, do you think you’re infertile? And sometimes, they would talk about how they had this “problem” or “challenge,” but infertility wasn’t the word they used or how they thought to describe themselves.

How can men being treated for infertility not think they’re infertile?

Barnes: It’s really important to understand that these men aren’t simply in some kind of deep-seated denial. This isn’t about an individual guy not understanding his body. Infertile men are part of an entire culture that doesn’t talk about male infertility, and will protect a man’s “manhood” at any cost. I discovered this whole social structure in place — doctors, nurses, the media — making sure, every step of the way, men don’t have to ever admit that they’re infertile. Even wives tread gently regarding their husband’s fertility issues.

For about a hundred years, we’ve had two basic assumptions that have shaped medical science and reproductive research. The first is that having babies is a woman’s work and the social myth goes, a woman will do anything to get pregnant. At a certain age, women are painted as these people just desperate to have children, who will undergo any kind of fertility treatment necessary.

The second is that a man’s masculinity is tied to his virility. Think about the expressions we use: “That takes balls” or “He’s shooting blanks.”

Why do women bear the brunt of infertility treatments?

Barnes: The same ideas about gender that have guided birth control research — why don’t we have a male pill, for example — shape the way we treat infertility among couples.

Most commonly, we treat women first and there are a lot more options. Take IVF, a frequent treatment for infertile couples. While I don’t object to IVF and it’s provided many miracles for many people, it’s centered on a woman’s body, regardless of a man’s sperm count. IVF doesn’t fix any underlying “disorder.” Instead of figuring out how to raise a man’s sperm count, we often concentrate on getting more eggs out of the woman, or hyper-stimulating ovulation using the popular drug Clomiphene. There just isn’t a clearly medically defined protocol for infertile men as there is for infertile women.

Isn’t that treating a woman for the man’s medical “problem”?

Barnes: Yes, precisely. But it’s crucial to remember that both men and women are being disadvantaged here. Women are getting stuck with the brunt of medical treatments and men are being ignored by the medical system. The whole infertility process reveals that a lot of our ideas about gender do no one any favors.

So what’s the best way to break the cycle and help infertile men?

Barnes: That’s the million-dollar question. How do we break the social taboo? In the short term, we need a clearer path for moving infertile men through the medical system. Doctors, nurses and spouses need to talk more openly about male infertility. And couples need more information about the prevalence of male infertility and all the treatments available.

Long term, we need more male-centered reproductive research. We can’t change gender norms overnight. But reproduction is a good place to start. Of course, it probably wouldn’t hurt if a Hollywood actor like George Clooney or an athlete like Kobe Bryant ever announced they were suffering from male infertility.

Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Mai 17, 2014 11:00 am

Fertility hope for superslim women: New hormonal treatment could help those with low body fat who struggle with infertility to conceive without IVF

Treatment designed to help women with low body fat to start a family

Aimed at fitness fanatics who struggle with infertility due to lifestyles

It could also help female athletes forced to take a break from training

Doctor claims treatment could provide a less costly alternative to IVF

Critics fear anorexic women may start pregnancy they cannot maintain

Thousands of women could benefit from a new fertility treatment designed to help those with low body fat to start a family without IVF. The hormonal treatment is aimed at fitness fanatics who struggle with infertility due to their ultra-active lifestyles. But critics fear it could encourage women who are dangerously underweight or anorexic to start a pregnancy they cannot healthily maintain.

Hypothalamic amenorrhoea – which affects one in 100 women but one in ten female athletes, ballerinas and gymnasts – occurs among women who have lost a large amount of body fat due to dieting or intensive exercise.

Energy is diverted away from maintaining the reproductive system so periods stop and women are unable to conceive naturally.

The new treatment involves injecting the hormone kisspeptin to kick-start the reproductive process without the need to take a break from exercise.

One of the doctors leading the research, Dr Channa Jayasena of Imperial College London, said: ‘In the short term, infusions of kisspeptin can restore the pulses of luteinising hormone essential for female fertility. It could provide an attractive and less costly alternative to IVF.’

But although welcoming the research, a Society for Endocrinology spokesman warned of possible risks. ‘Women who exercise intensely stop their periods for a good reason: their bodies are not ready for the huge amount of energy needed to take an embryo through a pregnancy to a healthy baby without stealing energy stores from the mother.

‘If this technique was used in women with anorexia they could conceive, but we don’t know how well the baby would develop or if it would harm the mother.’

Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Mai 17, 2014 11:01 am

UAlbany study: Cholesterol may play role in fertility



“Good cholesterol” may play a role in programming an egg for a successful pregnancy, according to a new study led by University at Albany researcher Michael Bloom.

The researchers collected fluid from the ovarian follicles of 171 women undergoing in vitro fertilization at University of California, San Francisco. They were surprised, Bloom said, to find a greater variation in levels of high-density lipoprotein — HDL, or “good cholesterol” — within the same women than between women. Further, the extent of variability differed with age, size, cigarette smoking, race and infertility diagnosis — factors that predict the likelihood for a woman to deliver a baby following IVF treatments.

Their findings were published online in the journal Fertility and Sterility.

The next step, Bloom said, is to examine whether differences in ovarian cholesterol can predict the outcome of a pregnancy. If so, the findings could lead to medical interventions that help women have successful pregnancies.

What is now known is that HDL levels are connected to embryo quality, Bloom said.

“The higher the quality, the better chance a couple has that the embryo is going to become a crying baby,” Bloom said.

Other researchers involved in the study were UAlbany doctoral candidate Keewan Kim, reproductive endocrinologist Victor Y. Fujimoto of the UCSF and University at Buffalo biochemist Richard W. Browne. The group’s work is part of a larger study supported by the National Institute on Aging.


Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Mai 17, 2014 12:09 pm

The Relationship Between Stress and Fertility

It makes intuitive sense that stress should lead to decreases in fertility. It has certainly been observed in the animal model. If you stress animals by crowding them or limiting their access to food, their fertility rates decrease. When you put them in more comfortable surroundings or give them more food, they quickly begin to reproduce normally.

Until recently, there was less evidence about the relationship in humans. It isn’t really ethical to crowd humans or starve them in the interest of science. But a study published last month, by Courtney Lynch, Ph.D, and her colleagues at Ohio State University, for the first time documented that stress levels in women were in fact related to how long the women took to get pregnant. And the women who had the highest levels of a stress-related hormone when they began to try to get pregnant were twice as likely to go on to experience infertility as women who had the lowest levels.

What about women who are not simply trying to get pregnant but are already experiencing infertility (defined generally as a year of unprotected intercourse without a normal pregnancy)? Most of the research does show that the more stressed the woman is when she begins treatment, the less likely she is to conceive. It is a difficult field to research though, since there are so many contributing factors. For example, a 26 year old with normal hormone levels will likely report far less stress than a 42 year old whose hormone levels indicate that she is approaching menopause. The 26 year old is also more likely to get pregnant from treatment since in most cases, her eggs will be healthier. So if the 26 year old reports less stress and then gets pregnant, did she get pregnant because she was less stressed or did she get pregnant because she had more normal eggs? No way to answer that.

It doesn’t really matter, since reducing stress is a good idea for a number of reasons. The first is that infertility is incredibly stressful. Women who are experiencing infertility report the same levels of anxiety and depression as do women with cancer, HIV+ status, or heart disease. It is a very challenging time; the infertile couple is surrounded by fertile family and friends who get pregnant easily and talk nonstop about their pregnancies and babies. They likely don’t feel comfortable telling their boss(es) and so have to make up constant excuses to explain frequent work absences to make it to doctor’s appointments. Their sex life suffers since they are basically told by their doctor when they should and should not be making love, and many begin to associate sex with failure. Finally, infertility treatment is not covered by many insurance companies, is only mandated in a handful of states, and treatment can cost thousands of dollars per cycle. It is no surprise that most individuals feel sad and irritable.

Reducing stress not only can make the whole process more bearable, but may help couples cope far better with the rigors of treatment. Women who are depressed before they start infertility treatment are far more likely to drop out of treatment after only one cycle, thus limiting their chances of getting pregnant. In addition, there have been numerous studies which have shown that women who learn specific stress-reduction skills become less anxious and depressed, but also have far higher pregnancy rates.
So, there are numerous reasons to encourage learning stress management skills. They include:

Decreasing the unpleasantness of feeling sad and anxious
Decreasing the odds of dropping out of treatment
Increasing the chance of getting pregnant

Some of the best ways to relieve stress during infertility are to increase social support and learn specific ways to cope. Because infertility can be so isolating, which tends to happen since most people don’t tell anyone they are going through it, connecting with other women in the same situation is incredibly helpful. One of the best ways is through Resolve, the National Infertility Organization. Resolve offers support groups throughout the US as well as an incredible amount of online support via their web site. If there is no support group in your area, speak to your infertility doctor about having one of his nurses offer an informal one in the waiting room after hours. It might stun you how much better you can feel after simply hearing someone else voice the feelings you thought only you were experiencing.

Another important way to feel better is to learn specific skills, designed to decrease stress and increase a sense of control. There is a lot of research on mind/body groups, which combine social support as well as very specific skills acquisition training on stress reduction. Research shows that women who attend a mind/body group not only see their level of depression and anxiety return to normal, but also double their chance of pregnancy. Ask your infertility doctor if there is an infertility mind/body program in your area. If not, consider seeing a therapist who specializes in infertility counseling (you can find one by going to www.asrm.org and looking for a mental health professional via the MHPG) and ask her or him to teach you these skills.
Finally, here are a few more things to keep in mind.

Most couples don’t handle the emotional aspects of infertility in the same way. Don’t try to convince your partner to feel the way you do. You are each coping in the best way for you. Respect their coping style.
If someone has not gone through infertility, they may well have no idea what is a hurtful comment versus a helpful one. Telling someone that they are trying too hard, or suggesting they adopt, might be intended as supportive. Memorize several “snappy comeback lines” to better protect you when someone says something and you don’t tend to think well on your feet. So the next time someone tells you to just relax, you can respond that in fact, infertility is a disease which is no more likely to be cured by relaxation than any other disease.
Infertility is not a permanent crisis. Most people who receive treatment do indeed conceive a healthy baby. And if not, there are lots of ways to create a family. Infertility will not have a permanent negative impact on your quality of life, believe it or not.

Alice D. Domar, Ph.D, is the executive director of the Domar Center for Mind/Body Health at Boston IVF. She is an associate clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School and the author of “Conquering Infertility”. She is also on the Board of Resolve, the National Infertility Association.

Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Oct 07, 2014 11:58 am

First ever baby born from a transplanted womb is a healthy boy


Well, we certainly live in the future: The Associated Press is reporting that one of the women who received a transplanted womb last year has since given birth. Her baby boy, while premature, is reportedly healthy.

The mother is 36, and was born without a uterus. Her donated organ came from a close family friend -- a 61-year-old woman who'd already had two children of her own and gone through menopause. From the AP:

The recipient has had to take three medicines to prevent her body from rejecting the new organ. About six weeks after the transplant, she got her menstrual period - a sign the womb was healthy.

After one year, when doctors were confident the womb was working well, they transferred a single embryo created in a lab dish using the woman's eggs and her partner's sperm.

The mother's doctor, Mats Brannstrom of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, reported in January that he'd performed nine uterine transplants. Surrogacy isn't legal in Sweden, so for these nine women -- who had either been born without a uterus or had lost them to cervical cancer -- a risky, uncharted transplant was the only way to have their own biological children.

All previous attempts at transplantation had failed, and this child represents the first-ever birth from such a procedure. The baby, Brannstrom told the AP, is "fantastic." Brannstorm tells the AP that two of his other patients are pregnant as well, and at least 25 weeks along.

Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Oct 11, 2014 12:11 am

Si mai mult decat atat:





First womb-transplant baby won't be alone for long


GOTHENBURG, Sweden (AP) -- The world's first baby born from a transplanted womb is soon to have company.

Two more women who became pregnant after having womb transplants are due to deliver in the next few weeks - and that could be the start of a new wave of babies born this way, say the Swedish doctors who pioneered the technique.

"It means a lot to me that we are able to help patients who have tried for so long to have families," said Dr. Mats Brannstrom, a professor of gynecology and obstetrics at the University of Gothenburg, who led the project that brought about last month's pioneering birth. "This is the last piece of the puzzle in finding a treatment for all women with infertility problems."

Brannstrom predicted there would soon be many more babies born to women who have received donated wombs in countries where doctors are studying the technique, including Australia, Britain, the U.S., Japan and China.

Brannstrom said he has also started work on trying to grow a womb in the lab. That involves taking a womb from a deceased donor, stripping it of its DNA, then using cells from the recipient to line the structure. He has started preliminary tests in animals and estimated it would be another five years before the technique can be tried on humans.

While that may sound like science fiction, the techniques that led to the birth announced last week also sounded outlandish just years ago. "It makes what was formerly impossible possible," said Dr. Nannette Santoro, chair of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Colorado. She was not involved in Brannstrom's research.

The happy couple in Sweden named their son "Vincent" - which means "to conquer" - to celebrate a victory over their difficult journey to parenthood.

Welcoming The Associated Press into her home, the mother cradled her sleeping baby in a spotless, stylish kitchen where an errant pacifier on the counter was one of the only clues that a newborn was around.

She said she still could not believe she is a mother, after discovering at 15 that she had no womb and being told that she would never carry her own children. Now 36, she was one of nine women to receive a transplanted womb last year in a ground-breaking trial led by Brannstrom.

The mother spoke on condition the exact location of her home not be revealed; she would not be named because she does not want her son to become a target of publicity.

The mother said she never thought she might be the first to deliver a baby from a transplanted womb.

Her husband said the couple will be forever grateful to the 61-year-old woman who donated her uterus, the mother of one of his best friends. The woman - now the boy's godmother - made the offer after hearing about the difficulties the young couple was having in starting a family.

"What she did for us was so amazing and selfless that the words `thank you' don't seem like enough," the father said.

These days, the new parents are busy marveling at their baby's expressive face and remarkably calm nature.

"He doesn't really scream, but he makes these funny little sounds," the mother said, comparing him to a kitten. Though his white wooden crib has a welcoming teddy bear and blankets, she said her son prefers to sleep between his parents in their bed.

She and her husband said they haven't quite figured out how they will tell their son that he made medical history once he's older.

"We will show him all the articles that were written and tell him everything we went through to get him," she said. "Maybe he will be inspired to become a doctor."

The couple hope they can be an inspiration to others struggling with infertility- but that's not why they did it.

"Yes, we're the first to do this, but that's not the important thing," the mother said.

Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Joi Oct 30, 2014 10:33 pm

Study finds neutralizing an immune system gene could improve the success of fertility treatments in women

Difficulty in conceiving a child is a major challenge for one in seven heterosexual couples in America, especially for those over the age of 35. Now a new discovery by researchers at Tel Aviv University and Chaim Sheba Medical Center at Tel Hashomer could boost the chances of conception in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.

Their new research reveals a linkage between the genes of the innate immune system—immunity with which human beings are born, rather than immunity they acquire during their lives—and ovarian longevity. The study, published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, constituted the doctoral work of Dr. Shiri Uri-Belapolsky of TAU's Sackler School of Medicine. The research was led by Prof. Ruth Shalgi, of the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology at TAU's Sackler School of Medicine, Dr. Yehuda Kamari and Prof. Dror Harats of TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sheba Medical Center, and Dr. Aviv Shaish of Sheba Medical Center.

According to research conducted on laboratory mice, the genetic deletion of the protein Interleukin-1 (IL-1), a key player in the innate immune system, could improve the number of eggs available for fertilization as well as improve the ovarian response to hormonal stimulation involved in IVF procedures. This could prove especially effective in women who initially respond poorly to hormonal treatment.

Neutralizing the risks

"We revealed a clear linkage between the genes of the innate immune system and female reproduction," said Dr. Uri-Belapolsky. "The results of our study, which point to neutralizing the effects of the IL-1 protein to slow down the natural processes that destroy the eggs, may set the basis for the development of new treatments, such as an IL-1 blockade that would raise the number of eggs recovered during an IVF cycle and reduce the amount of hormones injected into women undergoing the treatment."

The connection between IL-1 and fertility was discovered by accident in the course of research performed by the scientists on the role of IL-1 in atherosclerosis, the hardening of the arteries. In a surprise result of the research, the fertility lifespan of IL-1-deficient mice was found to be 20% longer than that of control wild-type mice.

Keeping the clock ticking

Female mammals, including humans, are born with a finite number of eggs and are subject to a biological clock that dictates the end of the reproductive lifespan at around 50 years of age. Over the past decade, a trend of postponing childbearing into advanced age has led to a corresponding upward trend in the number of IVF treatments. Inflammation has been reported to affect both IVF outcomes and the ovarian reserve adversely. "Identifying a possible culprit, such as Interleukin-1, may offer new insight into the mechanisms responsible for egg loss as well as practical interventions," the study reports.

"Our revelation is secured with a patent application, and naturally, further study in mice and in humans is required to examine this therapeutic opportunity," said Prof. Shalgi. "I believe we will take this research forward into human clinical trials. However, there is still research to be done before we can start these trials."

Sursa.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Noi 01, 2014 4:36 pm

SHAMPOO, CONDITIONER AND PERFUMES, A CAUSE FOR MALE INFERTILITY !!

It is a shocking news to all of us that the shampoos and creams which we use everyday which we consider harmless can be a cause for infertility and even testicular cancer in boys even before they are born. The culprit is Phthalates commonly found in skin lotions, shampoos, conditioners, make-up, perfumes, nail polish, hair spray etc. Phthalates is rarely listed as an ingredient on the bottle, so most of the time we are unwittingly using them

Phthalates are hormone-disrupting chemicals. Numerous studies conducted worldwide have confirmed that they are toxic to reproductive system and have other side effects. Phthalates reduce female fertility and can cause premature breast development in young women. Phthalates in a mother’s body can effect the fetal development of her child. Pregnant ladies who are exposed to high levels of phthalates are more likely to have sons with altered genital development and altered levels of testosterone.

The chemical disrupts the male hormone testosterone at a crucial stage of foetal development and doubles the rate of defects. In men, phthalates lower sperm counts, reduce sperm motility, and damage sperm. The alarming increase of reported cases of testicular cancer can also be attributed to this chemical. Women of reproductive age were found to have higher level of Phthalates in their body, the reason could be the growing use of cosmetics and plastic products. Phthalates have also been linked to obesity as they can also act as endocrine disruptors. Statistics show that in the last 50 years infant boys diagnosed with genital abnormality has doubled. By washing their hair or by using make-up the pregnant women are unknowingly increasing the risk of their sons suffering defective sex organs, low sperm counts and even cancer

Phthalates are used to make plastics soft and flexible. A 2002 study tested 72 cosmetic products from major U.S. brands found phthalates in nearly 75% of them. None of them had the word phthalates on the label. The only remedy for this Gordian knot is to reduce our exposure to phthalates by avoiding Vinyl and PVC plastic and choosing phthalate-free cosmetics. Alternatives like Shikkakkai and herbal powders can be used for shampoos, dye can be substituted with natural henna and home made fruit face packs and honey can be used to replace chemical rich cosmetic creams. The health and wellbeing of the future generation is in our hands, so if we can take a little trouble our children will be hale and healthy.

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Noi 25, 2014 12:34 pm

Women’s ovaries should be screened at 30 to predict fertility, experts say

ALL women should have their ovaries screened when they turn 30 to measure how many child-bearing years they have left, ethicists say.

The controversial ovarian reserve screening has been backed by Australian ethicists, who say routine and individualised testing would help more women fulfil dreams of becoming mothers.

But IVF experts say the tests could create unnecessary anxiety and drive more women to freeze their eggs in the ­unrealistic hope it will be their fertility saviour closer to their 40s.


Melbourne-born Oxford University professor Julian ­Savulescu and associate professor Kelton Tremellen say the blood test would give women an individual risk ­assessment of their overall ­fertility so they could bring ­forward plans to start a family or freeze their eggs if their ­reserves were low.

One test of ovarian reserve is measuring the anti-Mullerian hormone — the AMH test — secreted by cells in developing eggs to indicate the quantity but not quality of remaining eggs.

“While public awareness campaigns have resulted in the majority of women knowing that fertility declines with time, many disregard this advice as irrelevant to their own ­situation because they erroneously believe that their own healthy lifestyle or good family history of fertility is protective in some way,” they wrote in the journal Human Reproduction.

The authors acknowledge resistance to the test, in that it has not been conclusively proven that a poor ovarian ­reserve screening result has implications for conception potential over the next six months.

But they said doctors had an “ethical duty” to inform women about the existence of the screening, with surveys showing that up to 80 per cent of women would bring forward pregnancy plans if they knew their child-bearing days were numbered.

Monash IVF’s international medical director, Professor Gab Kovacs, said while the AMH test had a place prior to starting IVF to determine what dose of hormones to use, using it as a routine test would only cause anxiety.

[url]Sursa=http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/womens-ovaries-should-be-screened-at-30-to-predict-fertility-experts-say/story-e6frg6n6-1227133630511?nk=6c44614dc26667663311d9717d6fbe46[/url].
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Joi Noi 27, 2014 2:30 pm

„Treat yourself as kindly as you would treat the baby you long for. ” „Don't give up. You will be a mother.”

7 Lessons I Learned about Infertility after Adoption, Donor Egg and IVF.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Joi Dec 04, 2014 2:13 pm

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mie Mai 13, 2015 6:31 am

Spermatozoizi umani viabili, creati in vitro de o echipa de cercetatori francezi

O echipa de cercetatori francezi sustine ca a reusit sa creeze in vitro spermatozoizi umani viabili, pornind de la celule testiculare imature, iar reusita, daca va fi confirmata, ar putea deschide o noua cale in lupta contra infertilitatii masculine, potrivit lexpress.fr, citat de Mediafax.

Anuntul a fost primit de lumea stiintifica cu prudenta, descoperirea nefiind inca prezentata intr-un studiu stiintific publicat in presa de specialitate. Insa, daca va fi confirmata, va fi un pas inainte in ceea ce priveste tratarea infertilitatii masculine.

Kallistem, o companie de biotehnologie cu sediul la Lyon, a anuntat, saptamana aceasta, ca a reusit sa obtina, la sfarsitul anului 2014, “spermatozoizi umani completi in laborator”. “Acesti spermatozoizi umani complet formati” au fost creati pornind de la “biopsii testiculare ale pacientilor, care nu contineau decat celule germinale imature (spermatogonii)”, a precizat compania intr-un comunicat, calificand descoperirea drept “o premiera mondiala”. Anterior, s-au obtinut spermatozoizi in laborator, dar acele studii au fost facute pe soareci.

Noile descoperiri, ale caror detalii nu sunt deocamdata prezentate public, “deschid calea unor terapii inovatoare pentru conservarea si redarea fertilitatii masculine, o veritabila provocare a societatii la nivel mondial, unde, in ultimii 50 de ani, s-a remarcat o scadere cu 50% a numarului de spermatozoizi”, potrivit companiei franceze.

In publicatia franceza Le Figaro, cercetatorii au salutat anuntul laboratorului din Lyon, considerand descoperirea promitatoare, insa au facut apel la prudenta. “Daca functioneaza, procedura deschide mari perspective”, este de parere medicul Nathalie Rives, de la centrul de medicina reproductiva CHU din Rouen.

Rezervele acesteia sunt legate, de exemplu, de faptul ca unii adulti suferind de azoospermie (caz in care lichidul seminal nu contine spermatozoizi) prezinta “anomalii genetice care vor impiedica si spermatogeneza (procesul de producere a spermatozoizilor) in vitro”.

“Daca se confirma, este un pas inainte considerabil in tratarea sterilitatii masculine”, a declarat pentru Le Figaro si profesorul Israel Nisand, seful clinicii de ginecologie din cadrul CHU din Strasbourg si cofondator al Forumului european de bioetica. Acesta este de parere ca, din punct de vedere etic, fabricarea spermatozoizilor in vitro este preferabila clonarii reproductive.

Sursa.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde N.C.B. » Mar Aug 11, 2015 12:20 pm

One of the biggest controversies in reproductive medicine: natural killer cells

Leigh Travers and her partner Matt endured a six-year long struggle of seven heartbreaking miscarriages and $25,000 in IVF treatment before the successful birth of their daughter Ava.

Ms Travers believes they owe Ava's birth to the treatment for arguably the most controversial cells in reproductive medicine: natural killer cells (NK cells).

NK cells are part of the normal immune system and are responsible for cleaning up abnormal cells in our bodies, such as early cancer.

The contentious question is whether high levels of NKC contribute to infertility or increase the risk of miscarriage.

Doctor Gavin Sacks was the fertility specialist who recommended Ms Travers for an experimental treatment he developed, called Bondi Protocol.

"By lowering the body's immune response through the Bondi Protocol, we are trying to stop the natural killer cells from attacking the embryo in the womb because they see it as a foreign body," Dr Sacks explained on the IVF Australia website.

A blood test measures the number and activation levels of NK cells, and the treatment includes an immunosuppressant (such as steroids).

Dr Sacks has tested the Bondi Protocol on 87 women who had a poor prognosis; 56 had been trying for a baby for years with continued IVF failure, while the other 31 women had experienced recurrent miscarriage.

"For the women in the recurrent miscarriage group, 80 per cent became pregnant within a year naturally [after the treatment]. In the repeated IVF failure group, 68 per cent fell pregnant within three cycles of IVF," he wrote.

"The live birth rate in women under 38, with clinical history of no reproductive issues, was 86 per cent, which is very promising."

Researchers from the UK also found a link between NK cells and recurrent miscarriage.

However, Associate Professor Mark Bowman, from the Fertility Society of Australia, said there is yet to be a randomised controlled trial to confirm that the Bondi Protocol works, adding that "it's disappointing that no one has tried harder to make that trial happen".

He admitted that "for a small proportion of women who have had repeated miscarriage we think some of them have an altered immune response [which the Bondi Protocol targets], that makes it harder for them to remain pregnant".

But in addition to the lack of proper trials, he says it is difficult to determine how valid the NK cell tests are, and whether people are truly benefiting from the treatment.

"It might be reasonable for an doctor to say to their patient 'this treatment is not proven, but I've had some personal experience and if you want to try it you can', but it would just be important for that person to make a proper informed consent discussion," Prof Bowman said.

Doctor David Wilkinson, the medical director at City Fertility Melbourne, said doctors should try to provide a balanced perspective, but to not discount the treatment for the lack of evidence because "it's very difficult to always offer things that have absolutely been proven".

"There are a couple of doctors who are very strong believers in the NK cells … and others are not, but have some patients who are having a terrible time, and will do anything if they think it might increase their chances," Dr Wilkinson said.

"And you'll think 'well if something isn't dangerous, and everything else has been tried, and the patient wants to try it, then we'll go along with that'".

What's devastating for Ms Travers is that she was given this choice "too late", only receiving the Bondi Protocol treatment after seven failed pregnancies.

She remained on it for 16 weeks and had her healthy daughter Ava naturally in July 2013.

Sara La Cava also had repeated IVF failure following years of infertility.

On her fifth attempt of IVF and after eight months on NK cells treatment, she gave birth to healthy twins Alexander and Antonio in April last year.

"I wish that the natural killer cell testing would've happened sooner ... it could have been a quicker path to having children, and there aren't a lot of people who know about it," Mrs Cava said.

If doctors at least gave couples the option to have the testing earlier, rather that "not even mention it", Ms Travers believes it could avoid much trauma of emotional and financial pressure.

"It makes me mad that IVF clinics are not doing these NK cell tests as routine … we spent $25,000 on IVF and we didn't need it in the end. Even if it's not entirely proven, at least let people know this could be a possibility. I don't want anyone to go through what I went through," Ms Travers said.

Both Prof Bowman and Dr Wilkinson hope more trials will be done to confirm whether NKC treatment is effective, but Ms Travers and Mrs Cava said they have their evidence.

"Seven losses and then an eighth pregnancy on the [NKC] drugs that results in a take-home baby is too much of a coincidence for me," Ms Travers said.

"The proof of the pudding is Ava."

Sursa.
To make a looooong story short:

FIV nr. 7 (ET nr. 10) reusit, martie-aprilie 2013, Grecia, dr. Konstantinos Giatras.

Din 16 decembrie 2013, mama Larei.

* * *

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde N.C.B. » Vin Sep 18, 2015 9:39 pm

Hello! Reincep difuzarea de articole din presa cu unul de pe ...people.com „C'mon, Nicole, un articol mai stiintific nu gaseai si tu?!” Nu, nu, nu, asta este perfect. Mi se pare extrem de interesant. Pentru ca 1) este de bine ca tot mai multe persoane publice incep sa scoata din dulap scheletul infertilitatii - macar la americani, ca la noi persoanele publice cu probleme de fertilitate raman gravide in avion si 2) personajele / cazurile de infertilitate sunt atat de reprezentative, de manual! Avem femeia de 40+ care recunoaste ca s-a facut singura infertila, amanand indelung momentul conceperii; dar avem si femeia de mai putin de 30 de ani (habar n-am cine este, inteleg ca o modelina de la ei, de-acolo) care n-a amanat nimic, dar pur si simplu nu reuseste sa conceapa. Infertila social si infertila medical.


Tyra Banks and Chrissy Teigen Open Up About Fertility Issues: 'It's Been a Process'






In an emotional segment on their new daytime talk show FABlife, Tyra Banks and Chrissy Teigen discussed the troubles they've had with trying to conceive.

"Every single time I sit down for an interview with anybody…I will say, just being two years into being married, the questions just come from all over," Teigen said. "It's kind of crazy because I can't imagine being that nosy to be like, 'So, when are the kids coming?' because who knows what somebody's going through."

The 29-year-old model continued, revealing that she and her husband, singer John Legend, have had issues trying to get pregnant and have even seen fertility doctors.



"John and I were having trouble. We would have had kids five, six years ago if it had happened," she said. "But my gosh, it's been a process."

Teigen adds that as she started to open up about her own fertility struggles, she started to realize that many other women around her were experiencing the same thing.

Her sentiments hit closer to home than she expected.

Banks chimed in, admitting to fertility issues of her own, as she unexpectedly grew very emotional and began to cry, sharing that she put off kids in her twenties to focus on other things.

"It's so funny when I was 23 years old, I used to tell myself, 'In three years, I'm going to have kids.' Then I turned 24. 'In three years, I'm going to have kids,'" Banks, 41, said. "Every single year I kept saying that. And then after a while it's like, 'Okay, now I want to.' And it's not so easy."

Before FABLife premiered, the former supermodel, spoke to PEOPLE about her "traumatic" attempts with IVF procedures in hopes of conceiving.

"I've had some not happy moments with that, very traumatic moments," she said. "It's difficult as you get older. It's not something that can just happen."

While she and Teigen were honest about the difficulties of having children, Banks is staying positive.

She added to PEOPLE, "I hope [for kids]. I don't just want one child. I want a litter! And I want to be the kind of mom where my child can come to me for anything."

Sursa.
To make a looooong story short:

FIV nr. 7 (ET nr. 10) reusit, martie-aprilie 2013, Grecia, dr. Konstantinos Giatras.

Din 16 decembrie 2013, mama Larei.

* * *

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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mie Oct 14, 2015 2:01 pm

O poza cat un milion de cuvinte:

Imagine

Articolul, aici.
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Sâm Oct 31, 2015 5:04 pm

Un testimonial emotionant scris de un tatic: http://www.wsj.com/articles/adventures- ... 1446231687
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Vin Noi 27, 2015 12:07 am

Despre anonimitatea donarii de gameti in UK.

Debating donor conception 10 years after the removal of anonymity



'The kids are not alright.'

'Current legislation needs to do more to protect the rights of donor-conceived children.'

These were some of the comments made by donor-conceived adults who attended '10 Years Since the End of Donor Anonymity: Have We Got It Right?', an event organised by the Progress Educational Trust (PET, the charity that publishes BioNews) in partnership with the National Gamete Donation Trust (NGDT).

The event moderator, Charles Lister – chair of the NGDT – opened with a poignant quote from a 2004 speech by the then Public Health Minister, Melanie Johnson:

'Clinics decide to provide treatment using donors; patients make a decision to receive treatment using donors; donors decide to donate. Donor-conceived children, however, do not decide to be born – is it therefore right that access to information about the donation that led to their birth should be denied to them?'

This quote encapsulated the essence of the debates that led to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (Disclosure of Donor Information) Regulations 2004, which allow donor-conceived people born from donations made after 1 April 2005 access to identifying information about their donor on reaching the age of 18. It also set the scene for a series of lively presentations from a panel of five experts, who took to the stage to offer their perspective on the impact of the legislation.

First to speak was Juliet Tizzard, Director of Strategy at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), who gave the regulator's perspective on the change in law. Tizzard identified the lack of reliable outcome metrics in relation to donor conception as a key challenge, and hindrance, to accurate impact evaluation of the 2004 regulations. She also opined that the assessment of post-regulation sperm and egg donation trend as proxy measure of impact showed a gradual but steady increase in number of new donors registering in the UK – a reality that is a far cry from the doomsday prophecies of the early critics of the law, who predicted the possibility of severe donor shortages arising as a result of the end to donor anonymity.

Next on stage was Dr Jo Rose, a donor-conceived adult who won a landmark court case that contributed to the decision to end donor anonymity in the UK. In her presentation, Rose argued that donor-conceived children should, as a matter of course, have more support and the right to access full and complete information about their genetic parent, particularly because 'wrong and incomplete medical history kills people'. She also argued that a lack of retrospective access to identifying information means a number of donor-conceived people born before April 2005 live the rest of their lives 'tortured' by not knowing who their genetic family is.

'Why then should we have legislation that protects the rights of donors but ignores the rights of donor offspring?' she asked the audience.

Rose's presentation gave a personal note to the debate and made it easy to appreciate the rationale behind her call for retrospective disclosure of donor identity. According to her, more needs to be done to ensure 'equality and respect for genetic kinship and identity for all groups of the society'.

Eric Blyth, Emeritus Professor of Social Work at the University of Huddersfield, also made a case for retrospective disclosure of donor identity. Using data from the HFEA, Professor Blyth argued that the lack of retrospective access to identifying donor information means that upwards of 20,000 donor-conceived people born between 1991–2004 in the UK are denied the right to learn the identify of their donor.

Blyth also argued that, since the data presented by Tizzard showed that more than 150 donors who donated prior to April 2005 have chosen to waive their right to anonymity, protecting donor privacy may not be seen as equally important by all of those donors.

Venessa Smith, the Quality Assurance and Patient Coordinator at the London Women's Clinic, offered insights from the perspective of the service providers. She reported a change in sperm-donor demography and composition from 'young men donating for "beer money" pre-2005, to young professional males with families donating purely for altruistic reasons post-2005'. This, she argued, may be attributable to a post-2005 paradigm shift that resulted in a greater focus on the welfare of the donor-conceived child, rather than merely the successful outcome of the assisted reproduction process.

Smith also argued that the routine support and counselling offered to post-2005 donors ensures that 'donors who do make a donation are the right ones for the patients'. This has contributed to a significant increase in number of donors at the London Sperm Bank and London Egg Bank, she reported, such that patients now have a variety of choice and no longer have to wait long for donors.

The last presenter for the evening was Susan Golombok, Professor of Family Research and Director of the Centre for Family Research at the University of Cambridge. Her presentation focused on the how disclosure of donor conception in the UK had changed over the past 30 years.

Professor Golombok discussed two longitudinal studies. The first followed 111 donor insemination (DI) families who had children born in the mid-1980s, and another conducted some 15 years later followed 50 DI families and 51 egg donor (ED) families. In summary, in the earlier study fewer than 10 percent of parents had disclosed by the age of 18, whereas in the later study 67 percent of ED parents and 41 percent of DI parents had disclosed by the age of 14. So while it was encouraging to learn that the number of parents disclosing has increased, it was also apparent that parents who initially indicated willingness to disclose donor conception to their children did not always go on to do so.

When considering the welfare of the child, it was reassuring that no child responded to disclosure in a negative way, and no parents regretted disclosing.

The panel also fielded some questions from the audience, which centred on the practical aspects of donor disclosure. Emma Cresswell, a donor-conceived adult in the audience, insisted that it was no longer right to withhold information from donor-conceived adults. She argued that disclosure of donor conception should be an ethical duty, a parental responsibility and a legal requirement. She suggested that inclusion of identifying donor information on a donor-conceived child's birth certificate would guarantee this disclosure.

A number of audience members backed up this call for a review of current legislation to encourage disclosure, as and to remove donor anonymity retrospectively. Others raised questions about the ethics and practicality of enforcing the disclosure of donor conception, and pointed out that retrospectively lifting donor anonymity breaks promises made to people who donated before 2005.

Juliet Tizzard said that, in her view, the best approach was to support parents of donor-conceived children to encourage disclosure, rather than seeking to mandate it. Caroline Spencer, a behavioural psychologist and trustee of the Donor Conception Network, also emphasised the need to educate parents of donor-conceived children on the importance of disclosure while supporting them with practical tools and tips.

By the end of the evening, it was clear that emotions around the debate on donor anonymity run high, that neither the audience nor the panel would reach a consensus, and that issues surrounding donor anonymity and disclosure will continue to be hotly debated.


Sursa: http://www.bionews.org.uk/page_583995.asp
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SOS Infertilitatea
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Re: Din presa - despre infertilitate si/sau reproducere asis

Mesajde SOS Infertilitatea » Mar Dec 08, 2015 2:56 pm

Un articol lamuritor, cu cifre clare: nu FIV-ul in sine creste riscul de cancer ovarian, ci conditiile medicale (in principal endometrioza) care au facut necesara apelarea la FIV.


Why IVF’s link to ovarian cancer isn’t as simple as the headlines suggest

Figures for the disease are higher for women who have had the treatment but that’s because of fertility problems are a sign of underlying factors


Recently there were newspaper reports linking IVF to a higher risk of ovarian cancer . And yes, it’s true, the cancer figures from women who had undergone IVF did display this tendency.

Reading these reports must have been pretty scary for women who’d had IVF or were contemplating it. They shouldn’t have been.

Researchers at University College London studied the records of more than 255,000 women who’d had IVF since 1991. Within nine years of ­treatment, 386 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

The usual rate of ovarian cancer is about one in 75 women over her lifetime. The new figures raise this to one in 55 for women who have had IVF .

However, the rate for ovarian cancer is one in 46 among women who undergo IVF because of ­problems with their fertility. It’s one in 32 for women with endometriosis, a common and painful condition where cells from the uterus migrate to other parts of the body. These women seem to be ­particularly vulnerable.


Change of focus: We need to look at the women who seek IVF rather than the treatment itself

So the headlines were misleading. It’s not IVF itself that raises the risk of ovarian cancer, it’s the reasons behind a woman needing IVF that are linked to ovarian cancer. To be precise, those prone to the condition are women who resort to IVF before their 30s because of fertility problems and women with endometriosis.

This condition is linked to a 135% increase in the risk of developing the cancer, while infertility per se carries a 62% greater risk.

What’s happening here is that IVF is simply flagging up fertility problems related to a greater risk of ovarian cancer – IVF does not cause the disease.

Adam Balen, professor of reproductive ­medicine at the University of Leeds and chairman of the British Fertility Society, throws further light on this picture.

Prof Balen says that if IVF is needed due to a problem with the man, the risk of ovarian cancer isn’t increased.

He adds: “Women who have IVF along with certain conditions, such as ­endometriosis, may be at increased risk of developing ovarian cancer.”

It isn’t related to the number of IVF cycles either. Professor Balen theorised that women who ovulated more might find that the cells in their ovaries had to work harder to repair themselves, increasing the risk of the copying errors that can lead to cancer.

And he sensibly shifted our focus from IVF itself to the women who seek IVF. He suggested women with endometriosis and fertility difficulties should be ­regularly screened for ovarian cancer which has been made easier with a promising new blood test.

Sursa.
I always wondered
why somebody didn’t do
something about that,
then I realized
I AM SOMEBODY.

[...and you, and you!]

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